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J. Fungi 2018, 4(1), 8; doi:10.3390/jof4010008

Anti-Aspergillus Activities of the Respiratory Epithelium in Health and Disease

1
Manchester Fungal Infection Group, Faculty of Biology, Medicine and Health, University of Manchester, Manchester M13 9NT, UK
2
Northern Devon Healthcare NHS Trust, North Devon District Hospital, Raleigh Park, Barnstaple EX31 4JB, UK
3
The National Aspergillosis Centre, Education and Research Centre, Wythenshawe Hospital, Manchester University NHS Foundation Trust, Manchester M23 9LT, UK
4
Department of Clinical Microbiology and Immunology, Sackler School of Medicine, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv 69978, Israel
These authors contributed equally to this work.
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Received: 18 December 2017 / Revised: 3 January 2018 / Accepted: 5 January 2018 / Published: 8 January 2018
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Mucosal Fungal Infections)
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Abstract

Respiratory epithelia fulfil multiple roles beyond that of gaseous exchange, also acting as primary custodians of lung sterility and inflammatory homeostasis. Inhaled fungal spores pose a continual antigenic, and potentially pathogenic, challenge to lung integrity against which the human respiratory mucosa has developed various tolerance and defence strategies. However, respiratory disease and immune dysfunction frequently render the human lung susceptible to fungal diseases, the most common of which are the aspergilloses, a group of syndromes caused by inhaled spores of Aspergillus fumigatus. Inhaled Aspergillus spores enter into a multiplicity of interactions with respiratory epithelia, the mechanistic bases of which are only just becoming recognized as important drivers of disease, as well as possible therapeutic targets. In this mini-review we examine current understanding of Aspergillus-epithelial interactions and, based upon the very latest developments in the field, we explore two apparently opposing schools of thought which view epithelial uptake of Aspergillus spores as either a curative or disease-exacerbating event. View Full-Text
Keywords: Aspergillus fumigatus; respiratory epithelium; airway epithelial cells (AECs); spore uptake; epithelial responses; morphotypes; fungal pathogenesis; internalization Aspergillus fumigatus; respiratory epithelium; airway epithelial cells (AECs); spore uptake; epithelial responses; morphotypes; fungal pathogenesis; internalization
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This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. (CC BY 4.0).

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MDPI and ACS Style

Bertuzzi, M.; Hayes, G.E.; Icheoku, U.J.; van Rhijn, N.; Denning, D.W.; Osherov, N.; Bignell, E.M. Anti-Aspergillus Activities of the Respiratory Epithelium in Health and Disease. J. Fungi 2018, 4, 8.

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