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Comment published on 25 January 2016, see J. Cardiovasc. Dev. Dis. 2016, 3(1), 3.

Open AccessArticle
J. Cardiovasc. Dev. Dis. 2015, 2(4), 273-281; doi:10.3390/jcdd2040273

Takotsubo Cardiomyopathy: A Long Term Follow-up Shows Benefit with Risk Factor Reduction

1
Department of Cardiovascular Disease, Easton Hospital Easton, PA Clinical Professor of Medicine, Drexel University, School of Medicine Easton Cardiovascular Associates 2001 Fairview Ave, Easton, PA 18042, USA
2
Department of Medicine, Easton Hospital, 250 South 21 street, Easton, PA 18042, USA
3
Department of Cardiovascular Disease, Wright State University, 921 Wilmington Ave, Apt D, Dayton, OH 45420, USA
4
Department of Medicine, Easton Hospital, 250 South 21 street, Easton, PA 18042, USA
These authors contributed equally to this work.
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Andy Wessels
Received: 6 July 2015 / Revised: 28 October 2015 / Accepted: 6 November 2015 / Published: 16 November 2015
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Abstract

Only sparse data was available on long-term of Takotusbo Cardiomyopathy (TC). Previous studies suggested prognosis is not necessarily benign. We report the long-term follow-up of 12 TC patients actively managed with risk factor reduction. Retrospective analysis of all patients diagnosed with TC at our hospital between 1998 and 2010. We identified 12 patients with TC among 1651 cases of emergent left heart catheterization over 12 years. Mean follow-up time was 8.3 ± 3.6 years. All were female, 87% had hypertension, 25% had history of Coronary Artery Disease (CAD), 67% had hyperlipidemia, 44% had some preceding emotional trauma, and 44% had some physical/physiological stress. Previous studies have shown that over 50% of TC patients experience future cardiac events, and 10% have a recurrence of TC. Patients were prescribed therapeutic lifestyle changes (TLC) and guideline directed medical therapy (GDMT) for aggressive risk factor reduction. TLC included diet, exercise, and cardiac rehabilitation. GDMT often included aspirin, beta-blockers, ACE-inhibitors, and statins. Follow-up echocardiograms showed recovery and maintenance of the ejection fraction. There was no cardiac mortality and no recurrences of TC. Aggressive risk factor reduction with TLC and GDMT may be effective in improving the long term outcomes of patients with TC. View Full-Text
Keywords: Takotusbo Cardiomyopathy (TC); Myocardial Infarction with Normal Coronary Arteries (MINCA); stress-induced cardiomyopathy; Coronary Artery Disease (CAD) Takotusbo Cardiomyopathy (TC); Myocardial Infarction with Normal Coronary Arteries (MINCA); stress-induced cardiomyopathy; Coronary Artery Disease (CAD)
This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. (CC BY 4.0).

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MDPI and ACS Style

Khalighi, K.; Farooq, M.U.; Aung, T.T.; Oo, S. Takotsubo Cardiomyopathy: A Long Term Follow-up Shows Benefit with Risk Factor Reduction. J. Cardiovasc. Dev. Dis. 2015, 2, 273-281.

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