Next Article in Journal
Nutritional Comparison of White and Red Coccinia Abyssinica (Lam.) Cong. Accessions: An Under-Utilised Edible Tuber of the Ethiopian Highlands
Previous Article in Journal
Application of Surfactant Micelle-Entrapped Eugenol for Prevention of Growth of the Shiga Toxin-Producing Escherichia coli in Ground Beef
Previous Article in Special Issue
An Investigation of Sensory Specific Satiety and Food Size When Children Consume a Whole or Diced Vegetable
Article Menu

Export Article

Open AccessArticle
Foods 2017, 6(8), 70; doi:10.3390/foods6080070

Spices in a Product Affect Emotions: A Study with an Extruded Snack Product

1
WhiteWave Foods Company, Broomfield, CO 80021, USA
2
Food Science & Technology, University of Georgia, Griffin, GA 30223, USA
3
Center for Sensory Analysis and Consumer Behavior, Kansas State University, Manhattan, KS 66502, USA
4
Grain Science and Industry, Kansas State University, Manhattan, KS 66506, USA
5
Silvia C. King Consulting LLC, Maineville, OH 45039, USA
6
Food, Nutrition, Dietetics and Health, Kansas State University, Manhattan, KS 66506, USA
Data for this manuscript was collected at Center for Sensory Analysis and Consumer Behavior, Kansas State University, Manhattan, KS 66506, USA.
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Received: 14 June 2017 / Revised: 20 July 2017 / Accepted: 16 August 2017 / Published: 18 August 2017
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Food Choice, Ingestive Behavior and Sensation)
View Full-Text   |   Download PDF [1434 KB, uploaded 18 August 2017]   |  

Abstract

Food commonly is associated with emotion. The study was designed to determine if a spice blend (cinnamon, ginger, nutmeg, and cloves) high in antioxidants can evoke changes in consumer emotions. This was an exploratory study to determine the effects of these four spices on emotions. Three extruded, dry snack products containing 0, 4, or a 5% spice blend were tested. One day of hedonic and just-about-right evaluations (n = 100), followed by three days of emotion testing were conducted. A human clinical trial (n = 10), using the control and the 4% samples, measured total antioxidant capacity and blood glucose levels. The emotion “Satisfied” increased significantly in the 5% blend, showing an effect of a higher spice content. The 4% blend was significantly higher in total antioxidant capacity than the baseline, but blood glucose levels were not significantly different. View Full-Text
Keywords: emotion; spices; extruded snack; overall liking; clinical; antioxidants emotion; spices; extruded snack; overall liking; clinical; antioxidants
Figures

Figure 1

This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. (CC BY 4.0).

Scifeed alert for new publications

Never miss any articles matching your research from any publisher
  • Get alerts for new papers matching your research
  • Find out the new papers from selected authors
  • Updated daily for 49'000+ journals and 6000+ publishers
  • Define your Scifeed now

SciFeed Share & Cite This Article

MDPI and ACS Style

Bell, B.; Adhikari, K.; Chambers, E., IV; Alavi, S.; King, S.; Haub, M. Spices in a Product Affect Emotions: A Study with an Extruded Snack Product . Foods 2017, 6, 70.

Show more citation formats Show less citations formats

Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Related Articles

Article Metrics

Article Access Statistics

1

Comments

[Return to top]
Foods EISSN 2304-8158 Published by MDPI AG, Basel, Switzerland RSS E-Mail Table of Contents Alert
Back to Top