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Foods 2016, 5(1), 16; doi:10.3390/foods5010016

Behavior of Salmonella and Listeria monocytogenes in Raw Yellowfin Tuna during Cold Storage

1
Sea Grant College Extension Program, University of Maryland, Princess Anne, MD 21853, USA
2
Seafood Research and Education Center, Oregon State University, Astoria, OR 97103, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Michael Jahncke
Received: 17 January 2016 / Revised: 4 February 2016 / Accepted: 15 February 2016 / Published: 2 March 2016
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Seafood Processing and Safety)
View Full-Text   |   Download PDF [1833 KB, uploaded 2 March 2016]   |  

Abstract

Behavior of Salmonella and Listeria monocytogenes in raw yellowfin tuna during refrigeration and frozen storage were studied. Growth of Salmonella was inhibited in tuna during refrigerated storage, while L. monocytogenes was able to multiply significantly during refrigerated storage. Populations of Salmonella in tuna were reduced by 1 to 2 log after 12 days of storage at 5–7 °C, regardless levels of contamination. However, populations of L. monocytogenes Scott A, M0507, and SFL0404 in inoculated tuna (104–105 CFU/g) increased by 3.31, 3.56, and 3.98 log CFU/g, respectively, after 12 days of storage at 5–7 °C. Similar increases of L. monocytogenes cells were observed in tuna meat with a lower inoculation level (102–103 CFU/g). Populations of Salmonella and L. monocytogenes declined gradually in tuna samples over 84 days (12 weeks) of frozen storage at −18 °C with Salmonella Newport 6962 being decreased to undetectable level (<10 CFU/g) from an initial level of 103 log CFU/g after 42 days of frozen storage. These results demonstrate that tuna meat intended for raw consumption must be handled properly from farm to table to reduce the risks of foodborne illness caused by Salmonella and L. monocytogenes. View Full-Text
Keywords: survival; foodborne pathogens; Salmonella; Listeria monocytogenes; yellowfin tuna; refrigeration and frozen storage survival; foodborne pathogens; Salmonella; Listeria monocytogenes; yellowfin tuna; refrigeration and frozen storage
This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. (CC BY 4.0).

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MDPI and ACS Style

Liu, C.; Mou, J.; Su, Y.-C. Behavior of Salmonella and Listeria monocytogenes in Raw Yellowfin Tuna during Cold Storage. Foods 2016, 5, 16.

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