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Dent. J. 2015, 3(2), 67-76; doi:10.3390/dj3020067

Arrested Pneumatization of the Sphenoid Sinus on Large Field-of-View Cone Beam Computed Tomography Studies

1
Oral and Maxillofacial Radiology, University of Florida College of Dentistry, 1395 Center Dr, Room D8-6, Gainesville, FL 32610, USA
2
Neuroradiology, College of Medicine, University of Florida, Post Office Box 100374, Gainesville, FL 32610-0374, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Tolga F. Tozum
Received: 26 April 2015 / Revised: 5 May 2015 / Accepted: 7 May 2015 / Published: 11 May 2015
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Tomography in Dentistry)
View Full-Text   |   Download PDF [1464 KB, uploaded 11 May 2015]   |  

Abstract

Arrested pneumatization of the sphenoid sinus is a normal anatomical variant. The aim of this report is to define cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) characteristics of arrested pneumatization of sphenoid sinus in an effort to help differentiate it from invasive or lytic skull base lesions. Two cases are presented with incidental findings. Both studies, acquired for other diagnostic purposes, demonstrated unique osseous patterns that were eventually deemed to be anatomic variations in the absence of clinical signs and symptoms although the pattern of bone loss and remodeling was diagnosed as pneumatization of the sphenoid sinus by a panel of medical and maxillofacial radiologists following contrasted advanced imaging. It is important to differentiate arrested pneumatization of the sphenoid sinus from lesions, such as arachnoid granulations, acoustic neuroma, glioma, metastatic lesions, meningioma, or chordoma, to prevent unnecessary biopsies or exploratory surgeries that would consequently reduce treatment costs and alleviate anxiety in patients. View Full-Text
Keywords: arrested pneumatization; sphenoid sinus; development; craniofacial lesion; Cone-Beam Computed Tomography arrested pneumatization; sphenoid sinus; development; craniofacial lesion; Cone-Beam Computed Tomography
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This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. (CC BY 4.0).

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MDPI and ACS Style

Tahmasbi-Arashlow, M.; Barghan, S.; Bennett, J.; Katkar, R.A.; Nair, M.K. Arrested Pneumatization of the Sphenoid Sinus on Large Field-of-View Cone Beam Computed Tomography Studies. Dent. J. 2015, 3, 67-76.

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