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Children, Volume 5, Issue 1 (January 2018)

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Cover Story (view full-size image) The Latino population is the largest ethnic minority in the United States. Yet, evidence on how to [...] Read more.
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Open AccessReview ‘Total Pain’ in Children with Severe Neurological Impairment
Received: 28 November 2017 / Revised: 11 January 2018 / Accepted: 12 January 2018 / Published: 18 January 2018
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Abstract
Many children with palliative care needs experience difficulty in managing pain. Perhaps none more so than those with severe neurological impairment. For many years; behaviours in these children were misunderstood. As a result; pain was poorly recognised and inadequately managed. Significant advances have
[...] Read more.
Many children with palliative care needs experience difficulty in managing pain. Perhaps none more so than those with severe neurological impairment. For many years; behaviours in these children were misunderstood. As a result; pain was poorly recognised and inadequately managed. Significant advances have been made in the assessment and management of pain in this challenging group of patients. We summarise these advances; drawing on our own experience working with infants; children and young adults with palliative care needs within a UK tertiary paediatric palliative care service. We expand on the recent understanding of ‘Total Pain’; applying a holistic approach to pain assessment and management in children with severe neurological impairment. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Pediatric Palliative Care)
Open AccessArticle A Child’s Concept of Pain: An International Survey of Pediatric Pain Experts
Received: 12 December 2017 / Revised: 11 January 2018 / Accepted: 11 January 2018 / Published: 15 January 2018
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Abstract
A child’s ‘concept of pain’ refers to how they understand what pain actually is, what function pain serves, and what biological processes are thought to underpin it. We aimed to determine pediatric pain experts’ opinions of: (1) the importance and usefulness of assessing
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A child’s ‘concept of pain’ refers to how they understand what pain actually is, what function pain serves, and what biological processes are thought to underpin it. We aimed to determine pediatric pain experts’ opinions of: (1) the importance and usefulness of assessing a child’s concept of pain in clinical and/or research settings; (2) the usefulness of the content of items within currently published adult-targeted resources for assessing a child’s concept of pain; and (3) important domains of a child’s concept of pain to assess. Forty-nine pediatric pain experts (response rate = 75.4%) completed an online survey. Descriptive statistics and frequency of responses were analyzed. Experts from all included disciplines reported that assessing a child’s concept of pain is important and useful both clinically and in a research setting (>80% reported very or extremely useful for each item). Experts considered that the content of 13 items from currently published adult-targeted resources was useful, but the wording was too complex for children aged 8–12 years. Experts considered that all seven of the proposed domains of a child’s concept of pain was important to assess. The findings can be used to inform the development of an assessment tool for a child’s concept of pain. Full article
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Open AccessCommentary Current Evidence on Vitamin D Deficiency and Metabolic Syndrome in Obese Children: What Does the Evidence from Saudi Arabia Tell Us?
Received: 11 November 2017 / Revised: 23 December 2017 / Accepted: 11 January 2018 / Published: 15 January 2018
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Abstract
Obesity and vitamin D deficiency represent major health problems among Saudi children, and have been linked to chronic diseases. Obese children are at risk of developing vitamin D deficiency, which appears to have negative influences on energy homeostasis, impeded bone mineralisation, insulin resistance
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Obesity and vitamin D deficiency represent major health problems among Saudi children, and have been linked to chronic diseases. Obese children are at risk of developing vitamin D deficiency, which appears to have negative influences on energy homeostasis, impeded bone mineralisation, insulin resistance and inflammation. Evidence supporting the association between vitamin D deficiency of obese children and metabolic syndrome has not specifically been studied in early childhood. The mechanisms through which vitamin D deficiency is associated with metabolic syndrome in obese children needs further elucidation. This commentary aims to (i) summarise current knowledge of the association between vitamin D deficiency and metabolic syndrome in obese children; and (ii) discuss current evidence for the association among Saudi Arabian children. Full article
Open AccessCase Report Esophageal Web in a Down Syndrome Infant—A Rare Case Report
Received: 8 November 2017 / Revised: 5 January 2018 / Accepted: 8 January 2018 / Published: 11 January 2018
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Abstract
We describe the rare case of an infant with trisomy 21 who presented with recurrent vomiting and aspiration pneumonia and a failure to thrive. Infants with Down’s syndrome have been known to have various problems in the gastrointestinal tract. In the esophagus, what
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We describe the rare case of an infant with trisomy 21 who presented with recurrent vomiting and aspiration pneumonia and a failure to thrive. Infants with Down’s syndrome have been known to have various problems in the gastrointestinal tract. In the esophagus, what have been described are dysmotility, gastroesophageal reflux and strictures. This infant on evaluation was found to have an esophageal web and simple endoscopic dilatation relieved the infant of her symptoms. No similar case has been reported in literature. Full article
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Open AccessArticle A Retrospective Review of Resuscitation Planning at a Children’s Hospital
Received: 30 November 2017 / Revised: 18 December 2017 / Accepted: 20 December 2017 / Published: 4 January 2018
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Abstract
Resuscitation plans (RP) are an important clinical indicator relating to care at the end of life in paediatrics. A retrospective review of the medical records of children who had been referred to the Royal Children’s Hospital, Brisbane, Australia who died in the calendar
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Resuscitation plans (RP) are an important clinical indicator relating to care at the end of life in paediatrics. A retrospective review of the medical records of children who had been referred to the Royal Children’s Hospital, Brisbane, Australia who died in the calendar year 2011 was performed. Of 62 records available, 40 patients (65%) had a life limiting condition and 43 medical records (69%) contained a documented RP. This study demonstrated that both the underlying condition (life-limiting or life-threatening) and the setting of care (Pediatric Intensive Care Unit or home) influenced the development of resuscitation plans. Patients referred to the paediatric palliative care (PPC) service had a significantly longer time interval from documentation of a resuscitation plan to death and were more likely to die at home. All of the patients who died in the paediatric intensive care unit (PICU) had a RP that was documented within the last 48 h of life. Most RPs were not easy to locate. Documentation of discussions related to resuscitation planning should accommodate patient and family centered care based on individual needs. With varied diagnoses and settings of care, it is important that there is inter-professional collaboration, particularly involving PICU and PPC services, in developing protocols of how to manage this difficult but inevitable clinical scenario. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Pediatric Palliative Care)
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Open AccessArticle Factors Associated with Not Breastfeeding and Delaying the Early Initiation of Breastfeeding in Mecca Region, Saudi Arabia
Received: 25 November 2017 / Revised: 29 December 2017 / Accepted: 31 December 2017 / Published: 3 January 2018
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Abstract
The objective of the study was to find the determinants related to not breastfeeding (BF) and others related to the delay in the early initiation of BF in the Mecca region, Saudi Arabia. A cross-sectional study in the Maternity and Children Hospital and
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The objective of the study was to find the determinants related to not breastfeeding (BF) and others related to the delay in the early initiation of BF in the Mecca region, Saudi Arabia. A cross-sectional study in the Maternity and Children Hospital and primary healthcare centers was performed. A questionnaire was filled by dietitians to 814 asymptomatic Saudi mothers. Determinants related to not BF and the delay in the early initiation of BF were determined by binary logistic regression, and the odds ratio (OR) and 95% confidence interval (CI) were determined. Significant factors associated with not BF were not rooming-in infants in the mother’s room (OR: 2.37; 95% CI: 1.66–3.41) and using a pacifier (OR: 1.62; 95% CI: 1.13–2.33). The most significant determinant of the early initiation of BF was the initiation of bottle feeding (OR: 18.16; 95% CI: 10.51–31.4), followed by not rooming-in infants in the mother’s room (OR: 2.2; 95% CI: 1.52–3.18), initiation of partial feeding (OR: 1.89; 95% CI: 1.3–2.74), uninformed mothers regarding the importance of BF (OR: 1.56; 95% CI: 1.04–2.35), and cesarean sections (OR:1.42; 95% CI: 1.02–1.98). Risk factors affecting BF and the early initiation of BF in Mecca City should be highlighted in national campaigns to increase mothers’ awareness and promote BF practice. Full article
Open AccessCase Report Use of Pleuroperitoneal Shunt in Chylothorax Related to Central Line Associated Thrombosis in Sickle Cell Disease
Received: 21 November 2017 / Revised: 20 December 2017 / Accepted: 29 December 2017 / Published: 2 January 2018
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Abstract
Central vein thrombosis as a cause of chylothorax is uncommon, and in a few cases in the literature was related to thrombotic complications of central venous access devices (CVAD). Superior vena cava (SVC) occlusion-induced chylothorax has been described in adult sickle cell disease
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Central vein thrombosis as a cause of chylothorax is uncommon, and in a few cases in the literature was related to thrombotic complications of central venous access devices (CVAD). Superior vena cava (SVC) occlusion-induced chylothorax has been described in adult sickle cell disease (SCD) in a setting of chronic indwelling CVAD. There are limited reports on chylothorax induced by central venous thrombosis secondary to chronic CVAD in children with SCD. We describe an 8-year-old male patient, with a history of SCD, maintained on long term erythrocytapheresis for primary prevention of stroke, and whose clinical course was complicated by chylothorax which was successfully treated with a pleuroperitoneal shunt. Full article
(This article belongs to the Section Oncology and Hematology)
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Open AccessArticle The Effect of Detectable HIV Viral Load among HIV-Infected Children during Antiretroviral Treatment: A Cross-Sectional Study
Received: 4 November 2017 / Revised: 20 December 2017 / Accepted: 27 December 2017 / Published: 1 January 2018
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Abstract
The RNA viral load of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) is initially used to determine the status of the HIV infection. The goal of therapy following treatment failure is to achieve and maintain virologic suppression. A detectable viral load may relate to the progression
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The RNA viral load of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) is initially used to determine the status of the HIV infection. The goal of therapy following treatment failure is to achieve and maintain virologic suppression. A detectable viral load may relate to the progression of HIV infection. A cross-sectional survey was conducted from January 2013 to December 2014 at the Bamrasnaradura Infectious Diseases Institute, Thailand. The aim was to determine the prevalence of detectable HIV viral load (dVL) and analyze the factors associated with post-dVL conditions that occur independently of a switch to a new antiretroviral agent. The prevalence of dVL was 27% (27 of 101). The mean ages of dVL and non-dVL children were 12.0 and 12.3 years, respectively. Age, sex, body mass index for age z-scores, previous tuberculosis disease history and parental tuberculosis history of both groups were not significantly different (p > 0.05). The prevalence of poor adherence (<95%), influenza-like illness (ILI) and opportunistic infections were higher in dVL than non-dVL children (p < 0.05). The mean nadir CD4 cell count during the study was lower in dVL than non-dVL children (646 compared to 867, respectively; p < 0.05). Other factors were not significant (all p > 0.05). In multivariable analysis, dVL was significantly associated with ILI (odds ratio (OR) = 9.6, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.3–69.4), adherence (OR = 0.195, 95% CI = 0.047–0.811) and nadir CD4 during the study (OR = 1.102, 95% CI = 1.100–1.305). The prevalence of dVL was 27% with this dVL among HIV-infected children found to be associated with ILI, poor adherence and lower nadir CD4 during the study. Full article
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Open AccessArticle Role of RDW in Prediction of Burn after Caustic Substance Ingestion
Received: 23 October 2017 / Revised: 26 December 2017 / Accepted: 27 December 2017 / Published: 29 December 2017
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Abstract
A quantifiable, quick, inexpensive and reproducible predictor is needed to decide if caustic substance ingestion results in burn regardless of the symptoms. A multicenter cohort study was conducted to investigate the predictive value of red cell distribution width (RDW) in detecting the esophageal
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A quantifiable, quick, inexpensive and reproducible predictor is needed to decide if caustic substance ingestion results in burn regardless of the symptoms. A multicenter cohort study was conducted to investigate the predictive value of red cell distribution width (RDW) in detecting the esophageal burns. The data of 174 patients were retrospectively analyzed. Eleven patients were excluded due to inability to define the substance ingested. Complete blood count (CBC) was taken at admission, and an esophagogastroduodenoscopy was performed within the first 12–24 h in all patients, regardless of their symptoms. The age and gender of the patients, the types of substances ingested, the parameters in the CBC and the severity of the esophageal injury were correlated. Esophageal burns were diagnosed in 38 of 163 patients (23.3%). The risk of esophageal burn with RDW values below 12.20 was significantly lower. Multivariate analysis showed that RDW was the most significant predictor of esophageal burn (p = 0.000, odds ratio (OR) 7.74 (95% confidence interval (CI), 3.02–19.9)). Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analysis demonstrated 84.2% sensitivity at a cut-off value of 12.20 for RDW. The results showed that CBC parameters could avoid unnecessary esophagogastroduodenoscopy. The RDW values regardless of the symptomatology is a good predictor of esophageal burns, and an RDW value over 12.20 shows the increased risk of esophageal burn. Full article
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Open AccessCase Report Pediatric Hypothermic Submersion Injury and Protective Factors Associated with Optimal Outcome: A Case Report and Literature Review
Received: 30 November 2017 / Revised: 15 December 2017 / Accepted: 15 December 2017 / Published: 27 December 2017
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Abstract
Drowning is the 3rd leading cause of unintentional injury death worldwide, with the highest rates of fatality among young children. Submersion injuries with cardiac arrest can lead to long-term neurologic morbidity. Severe hypothermic submersion injuries have complex treatment courses and survivors have variable
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Drowning is the 3rd leading cause of unintentional injury death worldwide, with the highest rates of fatality among young children. Submersion injuries with cardiac arrest can lead to long-term neurologic morbidity. Severe hypothermic submersion injuries have complex treatment courses and survivors have variable neurocognitive outcomes. We describe the course of a hypothermic submersion injury in a 6-year-old previously healthy boy. The description includes premorbid and post-injury neurocognitive functioning. A review of the literature of pediatric cold-water submersion injury was performed. Despite prolonged cardiopulmonary resuscitation (>100 min) and water temperature well above freezing, our patient had an optimal neurocognitive outcome following hypothermic submersion injury. Available literature is limited but suggests that increased submersion time, increased duration of resuscitation, and higher water temperatures are associated with worse outcomes. Care guidelines have been created, but outcomes related to these guidelines have not been studied. Our case highlights potential important determinants of outcome after drowning. Incident specific characteristics and therapeutic interventions should be considered when evaluating this population. Treatment guidelines based on currently available literature may fail to incorporate all potential variables, and consideration should be given to prolonged resuscitative efforts based on individual case characteristics until further data is available. Full article
Open AccessArticle Devices for Ambulatory Monitoring of Sleep-Associated Disorders in Children with Neurological Diseases
Received: 18 September 2017 / Revised: 18 November 2017 / Accepted: 18 December 2017 / Published: 25 December 2017
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Abstract
Good sleep quality is essential for a child’s wellbeing. Early sleep problems have been linked to the later development of emotional and behavioral disorders and can negatively impact the quality of life of the child and his or her family. Sleep-associated conditions are
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Good sleep quality is essential for a child’s wellbeing. Early sleep problems have been linked to the later development of emotional and behavioral disorders and can negatively impact the quality of life of the child and his or her family. Sleep-associated conditions are frequent in the pediatric population, and even more so in children with neurological problems. Monitoring devices can help to better characterize sleep efficiency and sleep quality. They can also be helpful to better characterize paroxysmal nocturnal events and differentiate between nocturnal seizures, parasomnias, and obstructive sleep apnea, each of which has a different management. Overnight ambulatory detection devices allow for a tolerable, low cost, objective assessment of sleep quality in the patient’s natural environment. They can also be used as a notification system to allow for rapid recognition and prompt intervention of events like seizures. Optimal monitoring devices will be patient- and diagnosis-specific, but may include a combination of modalities such as ambulatory electroencephalograms, actigraphy, and pulse oximetry. We will summarize the current literature on ambulatory sleep devices for detecting sleep disorders in children with neurological diseases. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Sleep Medicine in Children and Adolescents)
Open AccessReview Enhancing Pediatric Palliative Care for Latino Children and Their Families: A Review of the Literature and Recommendations for Research and Practice in the United States
Received: 17 November 2017 / Revised: 15 December 2017 / Accepted: 20 December 2017 / Published: 22 December 2017
Cited by 1 | PDF Full-text (530 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
As the demand for pediatric palliative care (PC) increases, data suggest that Latino children are less likely to receive services than non-Latino children. Evidence on how to best provide PC to Latino children is sparse. We conducted a narrative review of literature related
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As the demand for pediatric palliative care (PC) increases, data suggest that Latino children are less likely to receive services than non-Latino children. Evidence on how to best provide PC to Latino children is sparse. We conducted a narrative review of literature related to PC for Latino children and their families in the United States. In the United States, Latinos face multiple barriers that affect their receipt of PC, including poverty, lack of access to health insurance, language barriers, discrimination, and cultural differences. Pediatric PC research and clinical initiatives that target the needs of Latino families are sparse, underfunded, but essential. Education of providers on Latino cultural values is necessary. Additionally, advocacy efforts with a focus on equitable care and policy reform are essential to improving the health of this vulnerable population. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Pediatric Palliative Care)
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Open AccessReview Feeding Intolerance in Children with Severe Impairment of the Central Nervous System: Strategies for Treatment and Prevention
Received: 1 December 2017 / Revised: 21 December 2017 / Accepted: 21 December 2017 / Published: 22 December 2017
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Abstract
Children with severe impairment of the central nervous system (CNS) experience gastrointestinal (GI) symptoms at a high rate and severity, including retching, vomiting, GI tract pain, and feeding intolerance. Commonly recognized sources of symptoms include constipation and gastroesophageal reflux disease. There is growing
[...] Read more.
Children with severe impairment of the central nervous system (CNS) experience gastrointestinal (GI) symptoms at a high rate and severity, including retching, vomiting, GI tract pain, and feeding intolerance. Commonly recognized sources of symptoms include constipation and gastroesophageal reflux disease. There is growing awareness of sources due to the impaired nervous system, including visceral hyperalgesia due to sensitization of sensory neurons in the enteric nervous system and central neuropathic pain due to alterations in the thalamus. Challenging the management of these symptoms is the lack of tests to confirm alterations in the nervous system as a cause of symptom generation, requiring empirical trials directed at such sources. It is also common to have multiple reasons for the observed symptoms, further challenging management. Recurrent emesis and GI tract pain can often be improved, though in some not completely eliminated. In some, this can progress to intractable feeding intolerance. This comprehensive review provides an evidence-based approach to care, a framework for recurrent symptoms, and language strategies when symptoms remain intractable to available interventions. This summary is intended to balance optimal management with a sensitive palliative care approach to persistent GI symptoms in children with severe impairment of the CNS. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Pediatric Palliative Care)
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