Next Article in Journal
An Overview of Mitigation and Adaptation Needs and Strategies for the Livestock Sector
Next Article in Special Issue
Relation between Short-Term and Long-Term Variations of Precipitation
Previous Article in Journal
The Challenge of Urban Heat Exposure under Climate Change: An Analysis of Cities in the Sustainable Healthy Urban Environments (SHUE) Database
Previous Article in Special Issue
Investigation of the Spatio-Temporal Variations in Atmosphere Thickness Pattern of Iran and the Middle East with Special Focus on Precipitation in Iran
Article Menu

Export Article

Open AccessArticle
Climate 2017, 5(4), 94; doi:10.3390/cli5040094

Trend of Outbreak of Thermal Illness Patients Based on Temperature 2002–2013 in Korea

1
Laboratory of Emergency Medical Services, Seoul National University Hospital Biomedical Research Institute, 101 Daehak-Ro, Jongno-Gu, Seoul 03080, Korea
2
Department of Emergency Medicine, Seoul National University College of Medicine and Hospital, 101 Daehak-Ro, Jongno-Gu, Seoul 03080, Korea
3
Department of Emergency Medicine, Seoul National University Boramae Medical Center 20, Boramae 5gil, Shindaebang 2dong, Dongjak-Gu, Seoul 07061, Korea
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Received: 16 October 2017 / Revised: 8 December 2017 / Accepted: 11 December 2017 / Published: 13 December 2017
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Decadal Variability and Predictability of Climate)
View Full-Text   |   Download PDF [528 KB, uploaded 13 December 2017]   |  

Abstract

Climate change can have serious impacts on human health, resulting in increased healthcare utilization. Many studies on the relationship between mortality and temperature exist, but few studies focus on heat related outbreaks. Our objective was to verify the relationship between ambient temperature and heat related illnesses during the summer months. This study analyzed the National Health Insurance Service (NHIS) database. Patients with an ICD-10 code T67 (Effects of Heat and Light) presenting between May and September were included. Generalized additive models (GAM) were used to determine the association between ambient temperature and heat related illnesses including differences by region and patient age. A total of 335,759 patients with heat related illnesses were identified from 2002 to 2013. The number of heat related illnesses increased from 14,994 in 2002 to 29,332 in 2013. For every 1 °C increase in the daily temperature above 29.5 °C, the number of patients with heat related illnesses also increased (RR 1.060; 95% CI, 1.059 to 1.061). In addition, a higher association between temperature and outbreaks of heat related to elderly patients (RR 1.084; 95% CI, 1.081 to 1.086) and rural patients (RR 1.229; 95% CI, 1.208 to 1.251) was identified. The association between the daily maximum temperature and outbreaks of heat related illness is identified. The number of patients with heat related illnesses increased over the years and was especially noted in elderly and rural patients. View Full-Text
Keywords: hot temperature; aged; rural hot temperature; aged; rural
Figures

Figure 1

This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. (CC BY 4.0).

Scifeed alert for new publications

Never miss any articles matching your research from any publisher
  • Get alerts for new papers matching your research
  • Find out the new papers from selected authors
  • Updated daily for 49'000+ journals and 6000+ publishers
  • Define your Scifeed now

SciFeed Share & Cite This Article

MDPI and ACS Style

Kim, J.; Song, K.J.; Hong, K.J.; Ro, Y.S. Trend of Outbreak of Thermal Illness Patients Based on Temperature 2002–2013 in Korea. Climate 2017, 5, 94.

Show more citation formats Show less citations formats

Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Related Articles

Article Metrics

Article Access Statistics

1

Comments

[Return to top]
Climate EISSN 2225-1154 Published by MDPI AG, Basel, Switzerland RSS E-Mail Table of Contents Alert
Back to Top