Next Article in Journal / Special Issue
Influence of Urban Green Area on Air Temperature of Surrounding Built-Up Area
Previous Article in Journal
Predicting Impact of Climate Change on Water Temperature and Dissolved Oxygen in Tropical Rivers
Article Menu
Issue 3 (September) cover image

Export Article

Open AccessFeature PaperArticle
Climate 2017, 5(3), 59; doi:10.3390/cli5030059

Characterization of Urban Heat and Exacerbation: Development of a Heat Island Index for California

Altostratus Inc., 940 Toulouse Way, Martinez, CA 94553, USA
Academic Editors: Michele Zinzi and Matheos Santamouris
Received: 6 July 2017 / Revised: 1 August 2017 / Accepted: 2 August 2017 / Published: 5 August 2017
View Full-Text   |   Download PDF [4279 KB, uploaded 5 August 2017]   |  

Abstract

To further evaluate the factors influencing public heat and air-quality health, a characterization of how urban areas affect the thermal environment, particularly in terms of the air temperature, is necessary. To assist public health agencies in ranking urban areas in terms of heat stress and developing mitigation plans or allocating various resources, this study characterized urban heat in California and quantified an urban heat island index (UHII) at the census-tract level (~1 km2). Multi-scale atmospheric modeling was carried out and a practical UHII definition was developed. The UHII was diagnosed with different metrics and its spatial patterns were characterized for small, large, urban-climate archipelago, inland, and coastal areas. It was found that within each region, wide ranges of urban heat and UHII exist. At the lower end of the scale (in smaller urban areas), the UHII reaches up to 20 degree-hours per day (DH/day; °C.hr/day), whereas at the higher end (in larger areas), it reaches up to 125 DH/day or greater. The average largest temperature difference (urban heat island) within each region ranges from 0.5–1.0 °C in smaller areas to up to 5 °C or more at the higher end, such as in urban-climate archipelagos. Furthermore, urban heat is exacerbated during warmer weather and that, in turn, can worsen the health impacts of heat events presently and in the future, for which it is expected that both the frequency and duration of heat waves will increase. View Full-Text
Keywords: heat health; meteorological modeling; urban climate; urban-climate archipelago; urban heat island; urban heat island index; Weather Research and Forecasting model (WRF) heat health; meteorological modeling; urban climate; urban-climate archipelago; urban heat island; urban heat island index; Weather Research and Forecasting model (WRF)
Figures

Figure 1

This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. (CC BY 4.0).

Scifeed alert for new publications

Never miss any articles matching your research from any publisher
  • Get alerts for new papers matching your research
  • Find out the new papers from selected authors
  • Updated daily for 49'000+ journals and 6000+ publishers
  • Define your Scifeed now

SciFeed Share & Cite This Article

MDPI and ACS Style

Taha, H. Characterization of Urban Heat and Exacerbation: Development of a Heat Island Index for California. Climate 2017, 5, 59.

Show more citation formats Show less citations formats

Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Related Articles

Article Metrics

Article Access Statistics

1

Comments

[Return to top]
Climate EISSN 2225-1154 Published by MDPI AG, Basel, Switzerland RSS E-Mail Table of Contents Alert
Back to Top