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ISPRS Int. J. Geo-Inf. 2014, 3(3), 1101-1117; doi:10.3390/ijgi3031101

The Potential of Urban Agriculture in Montréal: A Quantitative Assessment

1
Department of Natural Resource Sciences, McGill University, 21 111 Lakeshore Road, Montréal, QC H9X 3V9, Canada
2
Department of Geography, McGill University, 805 Sherbrooke Street West, Montréal, QC H3A 2K6, Canada
3
Bartlett School of Planning, University College London, 14 Upper Woburn Place, London WC1H 0NN, UK
4
Department of Methods and Models for Economics, Territory and Finance, La Sapienza University of Rome, Piazzale Aldo Moro 5, Rome 00185, Italy
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Received: 19 May 2014 / Revised: 1 August 2014 / Accepted: 26 August 2014 / Published: 10 September 2014
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Abstract

Growing food in urban areas could solve a multitude of social and environmental problems. These potential benefits have resulted in an increased demand for urban agriculture (UA), though quantitative data is lacking on the feasibility of conversion to large-scale practices. This study uses multiple land use scenarios to determine different spaces that could be allocated to vegetable production in Montréal, including residential gardens, industrial rooftops and vacant space. Considering a range of both soil-bound and hydroponic yields, the ability of these scenarios to render Montréal self-sufficient in terms of vegetable production is assessed. The results show that the island could easily satisfy its vegetable demand if hydroponics are implemented on industrial rooftops, though these operations are generally costly. Using only vacant space, however, also has the potential to meet the city’s demand and requires lower operating costs. A performance index was developed to evaluate the potential of each borough to meet its own vegetable demand while still maintaining an elevated population density. Most boroughs outside of the downtown core are able to satisfy their vegetable demand efficiently due to their land use composition, though results vary greatly depending on the farming methods used, indicating the importance of farm management. View Full-Text
Keywords: urban agriculture; land use design; Montréal; sustainable communities; food security; urban planning; resilience; urban development; food systems urban agriculture; land use design; Montréal; sustainable communities; food security; urban planning; resilience; urban development; food systems
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MDPI and ACS Style

Haberman, D.; Gillies, L.; Canter, A.; Rinner, V.; Pancrazi, L.; Martellozzo, F. The Potential of Urban Agriculture in Montréal: A Quantitative Assessment. ISPRS Int. J. Geo-Inf. 2014, 3, 1101-1117.

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