Next Article in Journal / Special Issue
Bioactive Plant Metabolites in the Management of Non-Communicable Metabolic Diseases: Looking at Opportunities beyond the Horizon
Previous Article in Journal
Effective Estimation of Dynamic Metabolic Fluxes Using 13C Labeling and Piecewise Affine Approximation: From Theory to Practical Applicability
Article Menu

Export Article

Open AccessReview
Metabolites 2015, 5(4), 720-732; doi:10.3390/metabo5040720

Obesity-Related Chronic Kidney Disease—The Role of Lipid Metabolism

1
Department of Nephrology, Austin Health, Heidelberg, Melbourne 3084, Australia
2
Department of Medicine, Austin Health, University of Melbourne, Heidelberg 3084, Australia
3
Institute for Breathing and Sleep, Austin Health, Heidelberg, Melbourne 3084, Australia
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Peter Meikle
Received: 3 November 2015 / Revised: 1 December 2015 / Accepted: 8 December 2015 / Published: 11 December 2015
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Metabolomic Studies in Metabolic Diseases)
View Full-Text   |   Download PDF [803 KB, uploaded 11 December 2015]   |  

Abstract

Obesity is an independent risk factor for chronic kidney disease (CKD). The mechanisms linking obesity and CKD include systemic changes such as high blood pressure and hyperglycemia, and intrarenal effects relating to lipid accumulation. Normal lipid metabolism is integral to renal physiology and disturbances of renal lipid and energy metabolism are increasingly being linked with kidney disease. AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) and acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACC) are important regulators of fatty acid oxidation, which is frequently abnormal in the kidney with CKD. A high fat diet reduces renal AMPK activity, thereby contributing to reduced fatty acid oxidation and energy imbalance, and treatments to activate AMPK are beneficial in animal models of obesity-related CKD. Studies have found that the specific cell types affected by excessive lipid accumulation are proximal tubular cells, podocytes, and mesangial cells. Targeting disturbances of renal energy metabolism is a promising approach to addressing the current epidemic of obesity-related kidney disease. View Full-Text
Keywords: obesity; chronic kidney disease; lipid metabolism; AMP-activated protein kinase; acetyl-CoA carboxylase; high fat diet; podocyte; mesangial cell; proximal tubule obesity; chronic kidney disease; lipid metabolism; AMP-activated protein kinase; acetyl-CoA carboxylase; high fat diet; podocyte; mesangial cell; proximal tubule
This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. (CC BY 4.0).

Scifeed alert for new publications

Never miss any articles matching your research from any publisher
  • Get alerts for new papers matching your research
  • Find out the new papers from selected authors
  • Updated daily for 49'000+ journals and 6000+ publishers
  • Define your Scifeed now

SciFeed Share & Cite This Article

MDPI and ACS Style

Mount, P.; Davies, M.; Choy, S.-W.; Cook, N.; Power, D. Obesity-Related Chronic Kidney Disease—The Role of Lipid Metabolism. Metabolites 2015, 5, 720-732.

Show more citation formats Show less citations formats

Related Articles

Article Metrics

Article Access Statistics

1

Comments

[Return to top]
Metabolites EISSN 2218-1989 Published by MDPI AG, Basel, Switzerland RSS E-Mail Table of Contents Alert
Back to Top