Next Article in Journal
Targeted Therapy of Hepatitis B Virus-Related Hepatocellular Carcinoma: Present and Future
Next Article in Special Issue
Zebrafish Models of Prader-Willi Syndrome: Fast Track to Pharmacotherapeutics
Previous Article in Journal
Acknowledgement to Reviewers of Diseases in 2015
Previous Article in Special Issue
Pituitary-Adrenal Axis in Prader Willi Syndrome
Article Menu

Export Article

Open AccessArticle
Diseases 2016, 4(1), 9; doi:10.3390/diseases4010009

The Developmental Trajectory of Self-Injurious Behaviours in Individuals with Prader Willi Syndrome, Autism Spectrum Disorder and Intellectual Disability

1
Brain and Mind Research Centre, University of Sydney, 94 Mallett St, Camperdown NSW 2050, Australia
2
Centre for Disability Research and Policy, University of Sydney, 94 Mallett St, Camperdown NSW 2050, Australia
3
Centre for Developmental Psychiatry and Psychology, Department of Psychiatry, School of Clinical Sciences, Monash University, 270 Ferntree Gully Rd, Notting Hill VIC 3168, Australia
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Received: 24 December 2015 / Accepted: 1 February 2016 / Published: 6 February 2016
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Prader-Willi Syndrome)
View Full-Text   |   Download PDF [196 KB, uploaded 6 February 2016]

Abstract

In the present study we examined the nature and developmental trajectory of self-injurious behaviour in Prader Willi syndrome (PWS) and autism spectrum disorder (ASD). The development of interventions is greatly aided by understanding gene to behaviour pathways, and this requires an accurate description of the behaviour phenotype, that is, which types and natural history of self-injurious behaviour are more common in PWS and ASD and which are shared with other forms of developmental disability. Self-injury displayed by individuals with PWS and individuals with ASD was compared with that reported in a group of individuals with intellectual disability due to mixed aetiology (ID group). Three self-injurious behaviours (head banging, skin-picking and hitting and/or biting self) were measured on five occasions over 18 years using the Developmental Behaviour Checklist (DBC) a well-validated caregiver report measure. Rates of skin picking were higher in individuals with PWS and hitting and/or biting self was higher in individuals with ASD compared to the ID group. Rates of head banging were similar across the three groups. Over time, skin-picking and head banging increased with age for individuals with ASD and hitting and/or biting self increased for the PWS group. In the PWS and mixed ID groups head banging decreased with age. These findings suggest that the typology and developmental trajectories of self-injurious behaviours differ between those with PWS and ASD. View Full-Text
Keywords: Prader Willi syndrome; autism spectrum disorder; self injurious behaviour; skin-picking; developmental trajectory Prader Willi syndrome; autism spectrum disorder; self injurious behaviour; skin-picking; developmental trajectory
This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. (CC BY 4.0).

Scifeed alert for new publications

Never miss any articles matching your research from any publisher
  • Get alerts for new papers matching your research
  • Find out the new papers from selected authors
  • Updated daily for 49'000+ journals and 6000+ publishers
  • Define your Scifeed now

SciFeed Share & Cite This Article

MDPI and ACS Style

Rice, L.J.; Gray, K.M.; Howlin, P.; Taffe, J.; Tonge, B.J.; Einfeld, S.L. The Developmental Trajectory of Self-Injurious Behaviours in Individuals with Prader Willi Syndrome, Autism Spectrum Disorder and Intellectual Disability. Diseases 2016, 4, 9.

Show more citation formats Show less citations formats

Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Related Articles

Article Metrics

Article Access Statistics

1

Comments

[Return to top]
Diseases EISSN 2079-9721 Published by MDPI AG, Basel, Switzerland RSS E-Mail Table of Contents Alert
Back to Top