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Cosmetics 2016, 3(3), 23; doi:10.3390/cosmetics3030023

Sensitization and Clinically Relevant Allergy to Hair Dyes and Clothes from Black Henna Tattoos: Do People Know the Risk? An Uncommon Serious Case and a Review of the Literature

1
Poison Control Centre, Niguarda Great Metropolitan Hospital, Piazza dell’ Ospedale Maggiore 3, 20162 Milano, Italy
2
Postgraduate School of Clinical Pharmacology and Toxicology, University of Milan, Via Vanvitelli 32, 20129 Milano, Italy
3
Paediatric Department, Fatebenefratelli-Sacco Great Metropolitan Hospital, Corso di Porta Nuova 25, 20121 Milano, Italy
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editors: Lidia Sautebin and Immacolata Caputo
Received: 31 March 2016 / Revised: 21 June 2016 / Accepted: 2 July 2016 / Published: 11 July 2016
View Full-Text   |   Download PDF [205 KB, uploaded 11 July 2016]

Abstract

Henna (Lawsonia inermis L.) tattooing has been used in Egypt and India since ancient times. Today this temporary body art is becoming increasingly popular among young people. Various chemicals are added to henna to darken and enhance the definition of tattoos, especially para-phenylenediamine (PPD), which is a strong sensitizer known to cause cross sensitive reactions to azoic dyes and other para-amino compounds. We present the case of an 18-year-old girl who became clinically sensitive to textile dyes after having showed a serious reaction both to her first hair dying when she was 16 years old and following the application of a temporary henna tattoo when she was a kid. The evidence from our literature review showed 33 cases of manifest sensitization to hair dye and only one of observable contact allergy to both hair and textile dyes from henna tattoos. The sensitization of children may have long-life lasting consequences, because of cross-reaction to dyes and other chemicals contained in hair colourants, clothes and drugs. Since tattoos are very popular and globalization has increased the circulation of unauthorized products we point out the need for informative campaigns about the risk of sensitization caused by temporary tattoos. View Full-Text
Keywords: phenylenediamines; tattooing; henna; hair dyes; azoic compounds; textile dyes allergic contact dermatitis phenylenediamines; tattooing; henna; hair dyes; azoic compounds; textile dyes allergic contact dermatitis
This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. (CC BY 4.0).

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MDPI and ACS Style

Moro, P.A.; Morina, M.; Milani, F.; Pandolfi, M.; Guerriero, F.; Bernardo, L. Sensitization and Clinically Relevant Allergy to Hair Dyes and Clothes from Black Henna Tattoos: Do People Know the Risk? An Uncommon Serious Case and a Review of the Literature. Cosmetics 2016, 3, 23.

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