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Biology 2013, 2(2), 514-532; doi:10.3390/biology2020514
Article

Composition, Diversity, and Stability of Microbial Assemblages in Seasonal Lake Ice, Miquelon Lake, Central Alberta

1
,
1,†
,
2
,
2,‡
 and
1,*
1 Department of Biological Sciences, University of Alberta, Edmonton, AB T6G2E9 Canada 2 Department of Earth and Atmospheric Sciences, University of Alberta, Edmonton, AB T6G2E9 Canada Current address: IEH Laboratories and Consulting Group, Lake Forest Park, WA 98155, Canada Current address: Department of Earth and Space Science and Engineering, York University, 105 Petrie Science Building, Toronto, ON M3J 1P3, Canada
* Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Received: 28 December 2012 / Revised: 5 March 2013 / Accepted: 6 March 2013 / Published: 27 March 2013
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Polar Microbiology: Recent Advances and Future Perspectives)
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Abstract

The most familiar icy environments, seasonal lake and stream ice, have received little microbiological study. Bacteria and Eukarya dominated the microbial assemblage within the seasonal ice of Miquelon Lake, a shallow saline lake in Alberta, Canada. The bacterial assemblages were moderately diverse and did not vary with either ice depth or time. The closest relatives of the bacterial sequences from the ice included Actinobacteria, Bacteroidetes, Proteobacteria, Verrucomicrobia, and Cyanobacteria. The eukaryotic assemblages were less conserved and had very low diversity. Green algae relatives dominated the eukaryotic gene sequences; however, a copepod and cercozoan were also identified, possibly indicating the presence of complete microbial loop. The persistence of a chlorophyll a peak at 25–30 cm below the ice surface, despite ice migration and brine flushing, indicated possible biological activity within the ice. This is the first study of the composition, diversity, and stability of seasonal lake ice.
Keywords: seasonal lake ice; Miquelon Lake; bacterial diversity; eukaryotic diversity; seasonal dynamics; winter-over dynamics seasonal lake ice; Miquelon Lake; bacterial diversity; eukaryotic diversity; seasonal dynamics; winter-over dynamics
This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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Bramucci, A.; Han, S.; Beckers, J.; Haas, C.; Lanoil, B. Composition, Diversity, and Stability of Microbial Assemblages in Seasonal Lake Ice, Miquelon Lake, Central Alberta. Biology 2013, 2, 514-532.

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