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Fibers 2018, 6(3), 46; https://doi.org/10.3390/fib6030046

Developing Novel Temperature Sensing Garments for Health Monitoring Applications

1
Advanced Textiles Research Group, School of Art & Design, Nottingham Trent University, Bonington Building, Dryden Street, Nottingham NG1 4GG, UK
2
School of Science and Technology, Nottingham Trent University, Clifton Lane, Nottingham NG11 8NS, UK
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Received: 30 April 2018 / Revised: 7 July 2018 / Accepted: 9 July 2018 / Published: 10 July 2018
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Electronically Active Textiles)
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Abstract

Embedding temperature sensors within textiles provides an easy method for measuring skin temperature. Skin temperature measurements are an important parameter for a variety of health monitoring applications, where changes in temperature can indicate changes in health. This work uses a temperature sensing yarn, which was fully characterized in previous work, to create a series of temperature sensing garments: armbands, a glove, and a sock. The purpose of this work was to develop the design rules for creating temperature sensing garments and to understand the limitations of these devices. Detailed design considerations for all three devices are provided. Experiments were conducted to examine the effects of contact pressure on skin contact temperature measurements using textile-based temperature sensors. The temperature sensing sock was used for a short user trial where the foot skin temperature of five healthy volunteers was monitored under different conditions to identify the limitations of recording textile-based foot skin temperature measurements. The fit of the sock significantly affected the measurements. In some cases, wearing a shoe or walking also heavily influenced the temperature measurements. These variations show that textile-based foot skin temperature measurements may be problematic for applications where small temperature differences need to be measured. View Full-Text
Keywords: wearable electronics; wearables; smart textiles; electronic textiles; E-textile; digital medicine; temperature; thermistor; wound management; sensor network wearable electronics; wearables; smart textiles; electronic textiles; E-textile; digital medicine; temperature; thermistor; wound management; sensor network
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This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. (CC BY 4.0).
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Lugoda, P.; Hughes-Riley, T.; Oliveira, C.; Morris, R.; Dias, T. Developing Novel Temperature Sensing Garments for Health Monitoring Applications. Fibers 2018, 6, 46.

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