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Fibers 2017, 5(3), 31; doi:10.3390/fib5030031

In Situ Produced Bacterial Cellulose Nanofiber-Based Hybrids for Nanocomposites

1
Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN 55455, USA
2
Fiber Science & Apparel Design, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Stephen C. Bondy
Received: 26 June 2017 / Revised: 21 July 2017 / Accepted: 11 August 2017 / Published: 22 August 2017
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nanofibers)
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Abstract

Two high-performance bacterial cellulose (BC) nanofiber-based hybrid structures were produced using an in situ self-assembly approach, one with microfibrillated cellulose (MFC) and another with sisal fiber, by incorporating them in the fermentation media. The fabricated BC-MFC hybrid and BC-sisal hybrid fibers showed enhanced mechanical properties compared to pure BC and sisal fibers, respectively. Tensile tests indicated BC-MFC hybrid and their nanocomposites fabricated with soy protein isolate (SPI) resin had better tensile properties than corresponding BC and BC-SPI nanocomposites. This was because of the uniform distribution of MFC within the BC nanofiber network structure which reduced the defects such as pores and voids or intersections of the BC nanofibers. BC-sisal hybrid fibrous structures were obtained after BC nanofibers self-assembled on the surface of the sisal fibers during the fermentation. The results of the microbond tests indicated that the BC-sisal hybrid fiber/SPI resin bond strength was higher than the control sisal fiber/SPI resin bond with p value of 0.02 at the significance level of 0.05. Higher bond strength is preferred since it can potentially lead to better tensile properties of the composites. The presented work suggests a novel route to fabricate hybrid nanocomposites with higher functional properties. View Full-Text
Keywords: Bacterial cellulose (BC); in situ self-assembly approach; bacterial cellulose-microfibrillated cellulose (BC-MFC) hybrid; bacterial cellulose-sisal (BC-sisal) hybrid; green composites; microbond test Bacterial cellulose (BC); in situ self-assembly approach; bacterial cellulose-microfibrillated cellulose (BC-MFC) hybrid; bacterial cellulose-sisal (BC-sisal) hybrid; green composites; microbond test
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This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. (CC BY 4.0).

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Qiu, K.; Netravali, A. In Situ Produced Bacterial Cellulose Nanofiber-Based Hybrids for Nanocomposites. Fibers 2017, 5, 31.

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