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Antibiotics 2017, 6(4), 35; https://doi.org/10.3390/antibiotics6040035

Nisin in Combination with Cinnamaldehyde and EDTA to Control Growth of Escherichia coli Strains of Swine Origin

1
School of Microbiology, University College Cork, Cork T12 YT20, Ireland
2
Teagasc Food Research Centre, Moorepark, Fermoy, Co., Cork P61 C996, Ireland
3
APC Microbiome Institute, University College Cork, Cork T12 YT20, Ireland
4
Department of Science, Waterford Institute of Technology, Waterford X91 K0EK, Ireland
These authors contributed equally.
*
Authors to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Leonard Amaral
Received: 14 November 2017 / Revised: 6 December 2017 / Accepted: 7 December 2017 / Published: 12 December 2017
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Top 35 of Antibiotics Travel Awards 2017)
Full-Text   |   PDF [2202 KB, uploaded 12 December 2017]   |  

Abstract

Post-weaning diarrhoea (PWD) due to enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) is an economically important disease in pig production worldwide. Although antibiotics have contributed significantly to mitigate the economic losses caused by PWD, there is major concern over the increased incidence of antimicrobial resistance among bacteria isolated from pigs. Consequently, suitable alternatives that are safe and effective are urgently required. Many naturally occurring compounds, including the antimicrobial peptide nisin and a number of plant essential oils, have been widely studied and are reported to be effective as antimicrobial agents against pathogenic microorganisms. Here, we evaluate the potential of nisin in combination with the essential oil cinnamaldehyde and ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) to control the growth of E. coli strains of swine origin including two characterized as ETEC. The results reveal that the use of nisin (10 μM) with low concentrations of trans-cinnamaldehyde (125 μg/mL) and EDTA (0.25–2%) resulted in extended lag phases of growth compared to when either antimicrobial is used alone. Further analysis through kill curves revealed that an approximate 1-log reduction in E. coli cell counts was observed against the majority of targets tested following 3 h incubation. These results highlight the potential benefits of combining the natural antimicrobial nisin with trans-cinnamaldehyde and EDTA as a new approach for the inhibition of E. coli strains of swine origin. View Full-Text
Keywords: antimicrobial resistance; antibiotics; antimicrobial peptide; enterotoxigenic E. coli; nisin; bacteriocin; essential oil; cinnamaldehyde; EDTA antimicrobial resistance; antibiotics; antimicrobial peptide; enterotoxigenic E. coli; nisin; bacteriocin; essential oil; cinnamaldehyde; EDTA
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This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. (CC BY 4.0).
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Field, D.; Baghou, I.; Rea, M.C.; Gardiner, G.E.; Ross, R.P.; Hill, C. Nisin in Combination with Cinnamaldehyde and EDTA to Control Growth of Escherichia coli Strains of Swine Origin. Antibiotics 2017, 6, 35.

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