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Biosensors 2018, 8(2), 52; https://doi.org/10.3390/bios8020052

Label-Free Bioanalyte Detection from Nanometer to Micrometer Dimensions—Molecular Imprinting and QCMs

1
Department of Analytical Chemistry, University of Vienna, Währinger Straße 38, A-1090 Vienna, Austria
2
Institute of Chemistry, University of the Punjab, Quaid-i-Azam Campus, Lahore 54590, Pakistan
3
Center for Interdisciplinary Research in Basic Sciences, International Islamic University, H-10, Islamabad 44000, Pakistan
Dedicated to Prof. Georg Winckler on the occasion of his 75th birthday.
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Received: 30 April 2018 / Revised: 19 May 2018 / Accepted: 21 May 2018 / Published: 1 June 2018
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Label-free Biosensing)
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Abstract

Modern diagnostic tools and immunoassay protocols urges direct analyte recognition based on its intrinsic behavior without using any labeling indicator. This not only improves the detection reliability, but also reduces sample preparation time and complexity involved during labeling step. Label-free biosensor devices are capable of monitoring analyte physiochemical properties such as binding sensitivity and selectivity, affinity constants and other dynamics of molecular recognition. The interface of a typical biosensor could range from natural antibodies to synthetic receptors for example molecular imprinted polymers (MIPs). The foremost advantages of using MIPs are their high binding selectivity comparable to natural antibodies, straightforward synthesis in short time, high thermal/chemical stability and compatibility with different transducers. Quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) resonators are leading acoustic devices that are extensively used for mass-sensitive measurements. Highlight features of QCM devices include low cost fabrication, room temperature operation, and most importantly ability to monitor extremely low mass shifts, thus potentially a universal transducer. The combination of MIPs with quartz QCM has turned out as a prominent sensing system for label-free recognition of diverse bioanalytes. In this article, we shall encompass the potential applications of MIP-QCM sensors exclusively label-free recognition of bacteria and virus species as representative micro and nanosized bioanalytes. View Full-Text
Keywords: molecular imprinting; quartz crystal microbalance (QCM); bioanalytes; label-free sensors; bacteria; viruses molecular imprinting; quartz crystal microbalance (QCM); bioanalytes; label-free sensors; bacteria; viruses
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This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. (CC BY 4.0).
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Mujahid, A.; Mustafa, G.; Dickert, F.L. Label-Free Bioanalyte Detection from Nanometer to Micrometer Dimensions—Molecular Imprinting and QCMs . Biosensors 2018, 8, 52.

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