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Nanomaterials 2016, 6(9), 175; doi:10.3390/nano6090175

Detection of Prohibited Fish Drugs Using Silver Nanowires as Substrate for Surface-Enhanced Raman Scattering

1
College of Food Science and Technology, Shanghai Ocean University, Shanghai 201306, China
2
Engineering Research Center of Food Thermal-processing Technology, Shanghai Ocean University, Shanghai 201306, China
3
School of Food Science, Washington State University, Pullman, WA 99165, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editors: Graham Bonwick and Catherine S. Birch
Received: 6 July 2016 / Revised: 22 August 2016 / Accepted: 9 September 2016 / Published: 21 September 2016
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nanomaterials in Food Safety)
View Full-Text   |   Download PDF [2434 KB, uploaded 21 September 2016]   |  

Abstract

Surface-enhanced Raman scattering or surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) is a promising detection technology, and has captured increasing attention. Silver nanowires were synthesized using a rapid polyol method and optimized through adjustment of the molar ratio of poly(vinyl pyrrolidone) and silver nitrate in a glycerol system. Ultraviolet-visible spectrometry, X-ray diffraction, and transmission electron microscopy were used to characterize the silver nanowires. The optimal silver nanowires were used as a SERS substrate to detect prohibited fish drugs, including malachite green, crystal violet, furazolidone, and chloramphenicol. The SERS spectra of crystal violet could be clearly identified at concentrations as low as 0.01 ng/mL. The minimum detectable concentration for malachite green was 0.05 ng/mL, and for both furazolidone and chloramphenicol were 0.1 μg/mL. The results showed that the as-prepared Ag nanowires SERS substrate exhibits high sensitivity and activity. View Full-Text
Keywords: SERS; silver nanowires; glycerol; malachite green; crystal violet; furazolidone; chloramphenicol SERS; silver nanowires; glycerol; malachite green; crystal violet; furazolidone; chloramphenicol
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MDPI and ACS Style

Song, J.; Huang, Y.; Fan, Y.; Zhao, Z.; Yu, W.; Rasco, B.A.; Lai, K. Detection of Prohibited Fish Drugs Using Silver Nanowires as Substrate for Surface-Enhanced Raman Scattering. Nanomaterials 2016, 6, 175.

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