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J. Funct. Biomater. 2015, 6(4), 1036-1053; doi:10.3390/jfb6041036

Fabrication of Poly-l-lactic Acid/Dicalcium Phosphate Dihydrate Composite Scaffolds with High Mechanical Strength—Implications for Bone Tissue Engineering

1
Department of Biomedical Engineering, Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis, Indianapolis, IN 46202, USA
2
Department of Biomedical and Applied Sciences, School of dentistry, Indiana University, Indianapolis, IN 46202, USA
3
Department of Pediatrics, School of Medicine, Indiana University, Indianapolis, IN 46202, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Hae-Won Kim
Received: 31 May 2015 / Revised: 28 October 2015 / Accepted: 2 November 2015 / Published: 4 November 2015
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Abstract

Scaffolds were fabricated from poly-l-lactic acid (PLLA)/dicalcium phosphate dihydrate (DCPD) composite by indirect casting. Sodium citrate and PLLA were used to improve the mechanical properties of the DCPD scaffolds. The resulting PLLA/DCPD composite scaffold had increased diametral tensile strength and fracture energy when compared to DCPD only scaffolds (1.05 vs. 2.70 MPa and 2.53 vs. 12.67 N-mm, respectively). Sodium citrate alone accelerated the degradation rate by 1.5 times independent of PLLA. Cytocompatibility of all samples were evaluated using proliferation and differentiation parameters of dog-bone marrow stromal cells (dog-BMSCs). The results showed that viable dog-BMSCs attached well on both DCPD and PLLA/DCPD composite surfaces. In both DCPD and PLLA/DCPD conditioned medium, dog-BMSCs proliferated well and expressed alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity indicating cell differentiation. These findings indicate that incorporating both sodium citrate and PLLA could effectively improve mechanical strength and biocompatibility without increasing the degradation time of calcium phosphate cement scaffolds for bone tissue engineering purposes. View Full-Text
Keywords: calcium phosphate cement; scaffolds; mechanical properties; cytocompatibility; PLLA calcium phosphate cement; scaffolds; mechanical properties; cytocompatibility; PLLA
This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. (CC BY 4.0).

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MDPI and ACS Style

Tanataweethum, N.; Liu, W.C.; Goebel, W.S.; Li, D.; Chu, T.M. Fabrication of Poly-l-lactic Acid/Dicalcium Phosphate Dihydrate Composite Scaffolds with High Mechanical Strength—Implications for Bone Tissue Engineering. J. Funct. Biomater. 2015, 6, 1036-1053.

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J. Funct. Biomater. EISSN 2079-4983 Published by MDPI AG, Basel, Switzerland RSS E-Mail Table of Contents Alert
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