Religions 2012, 3(4), 950-963; doi:10.3390/rel3040950
Article

The Confessions of Montaigne

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Received: 24 September 2012; in revised form: 10 October 2012 / Accepted: 11 October 2012 / Published: 15 October 2012
(This article belongs to the Special Issue From the Renaissance to the Modern World)
This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
Abstract: Montaigne rarely repented and he viewed confession—both juridical and ecclesiastical—with skepticism. Confession, Montaigne believed, forced a mode of self-representation onto the speaker that was inevitably distorting. Repentance, moreover, made claims about self-transformation that Montaigne found improbable. This article traces these themes in the context of Montaigne’s Essays, with particular attention to “On Some Verses of Virgil” and argues that, for Montaigne, a primary concern was finding a means of describing a self that he refused to reduce, as had Augustine and many other writers before and after him, to the homo interior.
Keywords: Montaigne; self; confession; prayer; repentance; interiority; sexuality; sincerity
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MDPI and ACS Style

Martin, J.J. The Confessions of Montaigne. Religions 2012, 3, 950-963.

AMA Style

Martin JJ. The Confessions of Montaigne. Religions. 2012; 3(4):950-963.

Chicago/Turabian Style

Martin, John J. 2012. "The Confessions of Montaigne." Religions 3, no. 4: 950-963.

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