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Agriculture 2017, 7(7), 57; doi:10.3390/agriculture7070057

Grasslands and Croplands Have Different Microbial Biomass Carbon Levels per Unit of Soil Organic Carbon

Department of Biology, Brandon University, 270-18th Street, Brandon, MB R7A 6A9, Canada
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Academic Editor: Yinglong Chen
Received: 1 April 2017 / Revised: 14 June 2017 / Accepted: 5 July 2017 / Published: 10 July 2017
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Dynamics of Root–Soil–Microbial Interactions)
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Abstract

Primarily using cropped systems, previous studies have reported a positive linear relationship between microbial biomass carbon (MBC) and soil organic carbon (SOC). We conducted a meta-analysis to explore this relationship separately for grasslands and croplands using available literature. Studies were limited to those using fumigation–extraction for MBC for field samples. Trials were noted separately where records were distinct in space or time. Grasslands were naturally occurring, restored, or seeded. Cropping systems were typical of the temperate zone. MBC had a positive linear response to increasing SOC that was significant in both grasslands (p < 0.001; r2 = 0.76) and croplands (p < 0.001; r2 = 0.48). However, MBC increased 2.5-fold more steeply per unit of increasing SOC for grassland soils, as compared to the corresponding response in cropland soils. Expressing MBC as a proportion of SOC across the regression overall, slopes corresponded to 2.7% for grasslands and 1.1% for croplands. The slope of the linear relationship for grasslands was significantly (p = 0.0013) steeper than for croplands. The difference between the two systems is possibly caused by a greater proportion of SOC in grasslands being active rather than passive, relative to that in croplands, with that active fraction promoting the formation of MBC. View Full-Text
Keywords: soil health; soil quality; meta-analysis; organic matter; active fraction; linear regression soil health; soil quality; meta-analysis; organic matter; active fraction; linear regression
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This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. (CC BY 4.0).

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McGonigle, T.P.; Turner, W.G. Grasslands and Croplands Have Different Microbial Biomass Carbon Levels per Unit of Soil Organic Carbon. Agriculture 2017, 7, 57.

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