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J. Clin. Med. 2015, 4(4), 535-547; doi:10.3390/jcm4040535

Sick Leave and Factors Influencing Sick Leave in Adult Patients with Atopic Dermatitis: A Cross-Sectional Study

1
Department of Dermatology/Allergology, University Medical Centre Utrecht, Heidelberglaan 100, 3584CX Utrecht, The Netherlands
2
Student Clinical Health Sciences, University Medical Centre Utrecht, Heidelberglaan 100, 3584CX Utrecht, The Netherlands
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editors: Sebastien Barbarot and Kim Thomas
Received: 5 December 2014 / Revised: 5 February 2015 / Accepted: 16 February 2015 / Published: 27 March 2015
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Epidemiology and Treatment of Atopic Eczema)
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Abstract

Background: Little is known about the prevalence of sick leave due to atopic dermatitis (AD). The current literature on factors influencing sick leave is mostly derived from other chronic inflammatory diseases. This study aimed to determine the prevalence of sick leave due to AD and to identify influencing factors. Methods: A cross-sectional study was carried out in adult patients with AD. Outcome measures: sick leave during the two-week and one-year periods, socio-demographic characteristics, disease severity, quality of life and socio-occupational factors. Logistic regression analyses were used to determine influencing factors on sick leave over the two-week period. Results: In total, 253 patients were included; 12% of the patients had to take sick leave in the last two weeks due to AD and 42% in the past year. A higher level of symptom interference (OR 1.26; 95% CI 1.13–1.40) or perfectionism/diligence (OR 0.90; 95% CI 0.83–0.96) may respectively increase or decrease the number of sick leave days. Conclusion: Sick leave in patients with AD is a common problem and symptom interference and perfectionism/diligence appeared to influence it. Novel approaches are needed to deal with symptoms at work or school to reduce the amount of sick leave due to AD. View Full-Text
Keywords: atopic dermatitis; sick leave; influencing factors; quality of life; socio-occupational factors; severity atopic dermatitis; sick leave; influencing factors; quality of life; socio-occupational factors; severity
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This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. (CC BY 4.0).

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MDPI and ACS Style

van Os-Medendorp, H.; Appelman-Noordermeer, S.; Bruijnzeel-Koomen, C.; de Bruin-Weller, M. Sick Leave and Factors Influencing Sick Leave in Adult Patients with Atopic Dermatitis: A Cross-Sectional Study. J. Clin. Med. 2015, 4, 535-547.

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