Next Article in Journal
Revealing the Effects of Nanoscale Membrane Curvature on Lipid Mobility
Previous Article in Journal
Comparison of the Simplification of the Pressure Profiles Solving the Binary Friction Model for Asymmetric Membranes
Article Menu

Export Article

Open AccessArticle
Membranes 2017, 7(4), 59; https://doi.org/10.3390/membranes7040059

Characterizing the Performance of Gas-Permeable Membranes as an Ammonia Recovery Strategy from Anaerobically Digested Dairy Manure

1
Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada, Ottawa Research and Development Centre, Ottawa, ON K1Y 4X2, Canada
2
Campus d’Alfred, University of Guelph, Alfred, ON N1G 2W1, Canada
3
Environment Canada, Pollutant Inventory and Reporting Division, Gatineau, QC J8X 4C6, Canada
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Received: 29 August 2017 / Revised: 14 September 2017 / Accepted: 28 September 2017 / Published: 7 October 2017
(This article belongs to the Section Membrane Applications in Water Treatment)
View Full-Text   |   Download PDF [1609 KB, uploaded 16 October 2017]   |  

Abstract

Capturing ammonia from anaerobically digested manure could simultaneously decrease the adverse effects of ammonia inhibition on biogas production, reduce reactive nitrogen (N) loss to the environment, and produce mineral N fertilizer as a by-product. In this study, gas permeable membranes (GPM) were used to capture ammonia from dairy manure and digestate by the diffusion of gaseous ammonia across the membrane where ammonia is captured by diluted acid, forming an aqueous ammonium salt. A lab-scale prototype using tubular expanded polytetrafluoroethylene (ePTFE) GPM was used to (1) characterize the effect of total ammonium nitrogen (TAN) concentration, temperature, and pH on the ammonia capture rate using GPM, and (2) to evaluate the performance of a GPM system in conditions similar to a mesophilic anaerobic digester. The GPM captured ammonia at a rate between 2.2 to 6.3% of gaseous ammonia in the donor solution per day. Capture rate was faster in anaerobic digestate than raw manure. The ammonia capture rate could be predicted using non-linear regression based on the factors of total ammonium nitrogen concentration, temperature, and pH. This use of membranes shows promise in reducing the deleterious impacts of ammonia on both the efficiency of biogas production and the release of reactive N to the environment. View Full-Text
Keywords: ammonia recovery; air pollution; dairy manure emission mitigation; gas-permeable membranes; ammonia emissions; biogas; ammonia inhibition ammonia recovery; air pollution; dairy manure emission mitigation; gas-permeable membranes; ammonia emissions; biogas; ammonia inhibition
Figures

Figure 1

This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. (CC BY 4.0).
SciFeed

Share & Cite This Article

MDPI and ACS Style

Fillingham, M.; VanderZaag, A.; Singh, J.; Burtt, S.; Crolla, A.; Kinsley, C.; MacDonald, J.D. Characterizing the Performance of Gas-Permeable Membranes as an Ammonia Recovery Strategy from Anaerobically Digested Dairy Manure. Membranes 2017, 7, 59.

Show more citation formats Show less citations formats

Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Related Articles

Article Metrics

Article Access Statistics

1

Comments

[Return to top]
Membranes EISSN 2077-0375 Published by MDPI AG, Basel, Switzerland RSS E-Mail Table of Contents Alert
Back to Top