Next Article in Journal / Special Issue
Gas Vesicle Nanoparticles for Antigen Display
Previous Article in Journal
Small Wonders—The Use of Nanoparticles for Delivering Antigen
Previous Article in Special Issue
Plant Viruses as Nanoparticle-Based Vaccines and Adjuvants
Article Menu

Export Article

Open AccessReview
Vaccines 2015, 3(3), 662-685; doi:10.3390/vaccines3030662

Nanoparticle Drug Delivery Systems Designed to Improve Cancer Vaccines and Immunotherapy

1,2
and
1,2,3,*
1
Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109, USA
2
Biointerfaces Institute, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109, USA
3
Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Darrell J. Irvine
Received: 17 July 2015 / Revised: 19 August 2015 / Accepted: 20 August 2015 / Published: 27 August 2015
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nanoparticle-Based Vaccines)
View Full-Text   |   Download PDF [427 KB, uploaded 27 August 2015]   |  

Abstract

Recent studies have demonstrated great therapeutic potential of educating and unleashing our own immune system for cancer treatment. However, there are still major challenges in cancer immunotherapy, including poor immunogenicity of cancer vaccines, off-target side effects of immunotherapeutics, as well as suboptimal outcomes of adoptive T cell transfer-based therapies. Nanomaterials with defined physico-biochemical properties are versatile drug delivery platforms that may address these key technical challenges facing cancer vaccines and immunotherapy. Nanoparticle systems have been shown to improve targeted delivery of tumor antigens and therapeutics against immune checkpoint molecules, amplify immune activation via the use of new stimuli-responsive or immunostimulatory materials, and augment the efficacy of adoptive cell therapies. Here, we review the current state-of-the-art in nanoparticle-based strategies designed to potentiate cancer immunotherapies, including cancer vaccines with subunit antigens (e.g., oncoproteins, mutated neo-antigens, DNA and mRNA antigens) and whole-cell tumor antigens, dendritic cell-based vaccines, artificial antigen-presenting cells, and immunotherapeutics based on immunogenic cell death, immune checkpoint blockade, and adoptive T-cell therapy. View Full-Text
Keywords: cancer immunotherapy; nanotechnology; cancer vaccine; lymphoid draining; adjuvant; dendritic cell; immune checkpoint; adoptive cell therapy cancer immunotherapy; nanotechnology; cancer vaccine; lymphoid draining; adjuvant; dendritic cell; immune checkpoint; adoptive cell therapy
This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. (CC BY 4.0).

Scifeed alert for new publications

Never miss any articles matching your research from any publisher
  • Get alerts for new papers matching your research
  • Find out the new papers from selected authors
  • Updated daily for 49'000+ journals and 6000+ publishers
  • Define your Scifeed now

SciFeed Share & Cite This Article

MDPI and ACS Style

Fan, Y.; Moon, J.J. Nanoparticle Drug Delivery Systems Designed to Improve Cancer Vaccines and Immunotherapy. Vaccines 2015, 3, 662-685.

Show more citation formats Show less citations formats

Related Articles

Article Metrics

Article Access Statistics

1

Comments

[Return to top]
Vaccines EISSN 2076-393X Published by MDPI AG, Basel, Switzerland RSS E-Mail Table of Contents Alert
Back to Top