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Workplace Racial Composition Explains High Perceived Discrimination of High Socioeconomic Status African American Men
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Brain Sci. 2018, 8(8), 140; https://doi.org/10.3390/brainsci8080140

Does School Racial Composition Explain Why High Income Black Youth Perceive More Discrimination? A Gender Analysis

1
Department of Psychiatry, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48104, USA
2
Center for Research on Ethnicity, Culture and Health, School of Public Health, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48104, USA
3
Department of Psychology, University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA), Los Angeles, CA 90095, USA
4
BRITE Center for Science, Research and Policy, University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA), Los Angeles, CA 90095, USA
Received: 11 July 2018 / Revised: 20 July 2018 / Accepted: 26 July 2018 / Published: 30 July 2018
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Abstract

Recent research has documented poor mental health among high socioeconomic status (SES) Blacks, particularly African American males. The literature has also shown a positive link between SES and perceived discrimination, suggesting that perceived discrimination may explain why high SES Black males report poor mental health. To better understand the role of contextual factors in explaining this pattern, we aimed to test whether school racial composition explains why high income Black youth perceive more discrimination. We explored these associations by ethnicity and gender. Using data from the National Survey of American Life-Adolescent supplement (NSAL-A), the current study included 810 African American and 360 Caribbean Black youth, with a mean age of 15. Ethnicity, age, gender, income-to-needs ratio (SES), skin color, school racial composition, and perceived (daily) discrimination were measured. Using Stata 15.0 (Stata Corp., College Station, TX, USA), we fitted seven structural equation models (SEMs) for data analysis in the pooled sample based on the intersection of ethnicity and gender. Considerable gender by ethnicity variations were found in the associations between SES, school racial composition, and perceived discrimination. For African American males but not African American females or Caribbean Black males or females, school racial composition fully mediated the effect of SES on perceived discrimination. The role of inter-racial contact as a mechanism for high discrimination and poor mental health of Black American adolescents may depend on their intersection of ethnicity and gender. School racial composition may be a mechanism for increased perceived discrimination among high SES African American males. View Full-Text
Keywords: African Americans; socioeconomic status (SES); income; mental health; inter-group contact; discrimination African Americans; socioeconomic status (SES); income; mental health; inter-group contact; discrimination
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This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. (CC BY 4.0).
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Assari, S. Does School Racial Composition Explain Why High Income Black Youth Perceive More Discrimination? A Gender Analysis. Brain Sci. 2018, 8, 140.

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