Next Article in Journal
Emotional Meta-Memories: A Review
Next Article in Special Issue
Pedunculopontine Gamma Band Activity and Development
Previous Article in Journal
Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder: Potential Role of Endocannabinoids Signaling
Previous Article in Special Issue
Caffeine Consuming Children and Adolescents Show Altered Sleep Behavior and Deep Sleep
Article Menu

Export Article

Open AccessArticle
Brain Sci. 2015, 5(4), 494-508; doi:10.3390/brainsci5040494

Topography of Slow Sigma Power during Sleep is Associated with Processing Speed in Preschool Children

1
Sleep and Development Laboratory, Department of Integrative Physiology, University of Colorado Boulder, Boulder, CO 80309, USA
2
Department of Psychology, University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh EH8 9JZ, UK
3
Department of Psychology and Neuroscience, University of Colorado Boulder, Boulder, CO 80309, USA
These authors contributed equally to the paper and are listed in alphabetical order.
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Marcos Frank
Received: 3 August 2015 / Revised: 23 October 2015 / Accepted: 29 October 2015 / Published: 4 November 2015
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Sleep and Brain Development)
View Full-Text   |   Download PDF [1577 KB, uploaded 4 November 2015]   |  

Abstract

Cognitive development is influenced by maturational changes in processing speed, a construct reflecting the rapidity of executing cognitive operations. Although cognitive ability and processing speed are linked to spindles and sigma power in the sleep electroencephalogram (EEG), little is known about such associations in early childhood, a time of major neuronal refinement. We calculated EEG power for slow (10–13 Hz) and fast (13.25–17 Hz) sigma power from all-night high-density electroencephalography (EEG) in a cross-sectional sample of healthy preschool children (n = 10, 4.3 ± 1.0 years). Processing speed was assessed as simple reaction time. On average, reaction time was 1409 ± 251 ms; slow sigma power was 4.0 ± 1.5 μV2; and fast sigma power was 0.9 ± 0.2 μV2. Both slow and fast sigma power predominated over central areas. Only slow sigma power was correlated with processing speed in a large parietal electrode cluster (p < 0.05, r ranging from −0.6 to −0.8), such that greater power predicted faster reaction time. Our findings indicate regional correlates between sigma power and processing speed that are specific to early childhood and provide novel insights into the neurobiological features of the EEG that may underlie developing cognitive abilities. View Full-Text
Keywords: early childhood; preschool children; sleep spindles; sigma power; high density EEG; processing speed; cognition early childhood; preschool children; sleep spindles; sigma power; high density EEG; processing speed; cognition
This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. (CC BY 4.0).

Supplementary material

Scifeed alert for new publications

Never miss any articles matching your research from any publisher
  • Get alerts for new papers matching your research
  • Find out the new papers from selected authors
  • Updated daily for 49'000+ journals and 6000+ publishers
  • Define your Scifeed now

SciFeed Share & Cite This Article

MDPI and ACS Style

Doucette, M.R.; Kurth, S.; Chevalier, N.; Munakata, Y.; LeBourgeois, M.K. Topography of Slow Sigma Power during Sleep is Associated with Processing Speed in Preschool Children. Brain Sci. 2015, 5, 494-508.

Show more citation formats Show less citations formats

Related Articles

Article Metrics

Article Access Statistics

1

Comments

[Return to top]
Brain Sci. EISSN 2076-3425 Published by MDPI AG, Basel, Switzerland RSS E-Mail Table of Contents Alert
Back to Top