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Brain Sci. 2015, 5(2), 144-164; doi:10.3390/brainsci5020144

Functional Neuroimaging Correlates of Autobiographical Memory Deficits in Subjects at Risk for Depression

1
Laureate Institute for Brain Research, 6655 South Yale Avenue, Tulsa, OK 74136, USA
2
National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD 20892, USA
3
Biomedical Engineering Center, College of Engineering, University of Oklahoma, Norman, OK 73019, USA
4
Janssen Research and Development, LLC, of Johnson & Johnson, Inc., Titusville, NJ 08560, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Derek G. V. Mitchell
Received: 20 January 2015 / Revised: 3 April 2015 / Accepted: 14 April 2015 / Published: 24 April 2015
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Emotion, Cognition and Behavior)
View Full-Text   |   Download PDF [535 KB, uploaded 24 April 2015]   |  

Abstract

Overgeneral autobiographical memory (AM) manifests in individuals with major depressive disorder (MDD) tested during depressed (dMDD) or remitted phases (rMDD), and healthy individuals at high-risk (HR) for developing MDD. The current study aimed to elucidate differences in hemodynamic correlates of AM recall between rMDDs, HRs, and controls (HCs) to identify neural changes following previous depressive episodes without the confound of current depressed mood. HCs, HRs, and unmedicated rMDDs (n = 20/group) underwent fMRI while recalling AMs in response to emotionally valenced cue words. HRs and rMDDs recalled fewer specific and more categorical AMs relative to HCs. During specific AM recall, HRs had increased activity relative to rMDDs and HCs in left ventrolateral prefrontal cortex (VLPFC) and lateral orbitofrontal cortex. During positive specific AM recall, HRs and HCs had increased activity relative to rMDDs in bilateral dorsomedial prefrontal cortex (DMPFC) and left precuneus. During negative specific AM recall HRs and HCs had increased activity in left VLPFC and right DMPFC, while rMDDs had increased activity relative to HRs and HCs in right DLPFC and precuneus. Differential recruitment of medial prefrontal regions implicated in emotional control suggests experiencing a depressive episode may consequently reduce one’s ability to regulate emotional responses during AM recall. View Full-Text
Keywords: autobiographical memory; depression; remitted depression; fMRI; hereditary risk for depression; prefrontal cortex autobiographical memory; depression; remitted depression; fMRI; hereditary risk for depression; prefrontal cortex
This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. (CC BY 4.0).

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MDPI and ACS Style

Young, K.D.; Bellgowan, P.S.F.; Bodurka, J.; Drevets, W.C. Functional Neuroimaging Correlates of Autobiographical Memory Deficits in Subjects at Risk for Depression. Brain Sci. 2015, 5, 144-164.

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