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Behav. Sci. 2014, 4(4), 487-510; doi:10.3390/bs4040487

Network of Spaces and Interaction-Related Behaviors in Adult Intensive Care Units

1
School of Architecture, Design and Planning, University of Kansas, 1465 Jayhawk Boulevard, Lawrence, KS 66045, USA
2
Fay W. Whitney School of Nursing, University of Wyoming, Dept. 3065, 1000 E. University Ave, Laramie, WY 82071-3065, USA
3
School of Medicine, University of Kansas Medical Center, 3901 Rainbow Blvd., Mailstop 1022, Kansas City, KS 66160, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Received: 15 September 2014 / Revised: 30 October 2014 / Accepted: 7 November 2014 / Published: 1 December 2014
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Abstract

Using three spatial network measures of “space syntax”, this correlational study describes four interaction-related behaviors among three groups of users in relation to visibility and accessibility of spaces in four adult intensive care units (ICUs) of different size, geometry, and specialty. Systematic field observations of interaction-related behaviors show significant differences in spatial distribution of interaction-related behaviors in the ICUs. Despite differences in unit characteristics and interaction-related behaviors, the study finds that when nurses and physicians “interact while sitting” they prefer spaces that help maintain a high level of environmental awareness; that when nurses “walk” and “interact while walking” they avoid spaces with better global access and visibility; and that everyone in ICUs “walk” more in spaces with higher control over neighboring spaces. It is argued that such consistent behavioral patterns occur due to the structural similarities of spatial networks over and above the more general functional similarities of ICUs. View Full-Text
Keywords: intensive care unit (ICU); interaction-related behaviors; space syntax; network of spaces; environmental visibility and accessibility intensive care unit (ICU); interaction-related behaviors; space syntax; network of spaces; environmental visibility and accessibility
This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. (CC BY 4.0).

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MDPI and ACS Style

Rashid, M.; Boyle, D.K.; Crosser, M. Network of Spaces and Interaction-Related Behaviors in Adult Intensive Care Units. Behav. Sci. 2014, 4, 487-510.

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