Next Article in Journal
Probing the Hidden Geology of Isidis Planitia (Mars) with Impact Craters
Next Article in Special Issue
Exposure to Selected Geogenic Trace Elements (I, Li, and Sr) from Drinking Water in Denmark
Previous Article in Journal
Developing Key Skills as a Science Communicator: Case Studies of Two Scientist-Led Outreach Programmes
Previous Article in Special Issue
Environmental Risk Assessment Based on High-Resolution Spatial Maps of Potentially Toxic Elements Sampled on Stream Sediments of Santiago, Cape Verde
Article Menu

Export Article

Open AccessReview
Geosciences 2015, 5(1), 15-29; doi:10.3390/geosciences5010015

The Legacy of Uranium Development on or Near Indian Reservations and Health Implications Rekindling Public Awareness

Department of Earth Sciences, Montana State University, P.O. Box 173480, Bozeman, MT 59717, USA
Academic Editors: Jose A. Centeno, Robert B. Finkelman and Olle Selinus
Received: 1 January 2015 / Revised: 16 January 2015 / Accepted: 26 January 2015 / Published: 3 February 2015
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Medical Geology: Impacts of the Natural Environment on Public Health)
View Full-Text   |   Download PDF [2115 KB, uploaded 3 February 2015]   |  

Abstract

Uranium occurrence and development has left a legacy of long-lived health effects for many Native Americans and Alaska Natives in the United States. Some Native American communities have been impacted by processing and development while others are living with naturally occurring sources of uranium. The uranium production peak spanned from approximately 1948 to the 1980s. Thousands of mines, mainly on the Colorado Plateau, were developed in the western U.S. during the uranium boom. Many of these mines were abandoned and have not been reclaimed. Native Americans in the Colorado Plateau area including the Navajo, Southern Ute, Ute Mountain, Hopi, Zuni, Laguna, Acoma, and several other Pueblo nations, with their intimate knowledge of the land, often led miners to uranium resources during this exploration boom. As a result of the mining activity many Indian Nations residing near areas of mining or milling have had and continue to have their health compromised. This short review aims to rekindle the public awareness of the plight of Native American communities living with the legacy of uranium procurement, including mining, milling, down winders, nuclear weapon development and long term nuclear waste storage. View Full-Text
Keywords: uranium; Native Americans; community based participatory research; abandoned mines; reservations uranium; Native Americans; community based participatory research; abandoned mines; reservations
Figures

This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. (CC BY 4.0).

Scifeed alert for new publications

Never miss any articles matching your research from any publisher
  • Get alerts for new papers matching your research
  • Find out the new papers from selected authors
  • Updated daily for 49'000+ journals and 6000+ publishers
  • Define your Scifeed now

SciFeed Share & Cite This Article

MDPI and ACS Style

Moore-Nall, A. The Legacy of Uranium Development on or Near Indian Reservations and Health Implications Rekindling Public Awareness. Geosciences 2015, 5, 15-29.

Show more citation formats Show less citations formats

Related Articles

Article Metrics

Article Access Statistics

1

Comments

[Return to top]
Geosciences EISSN 2076-3263 Published by MDPI AG, Basel, Switzerland RSS E-Mail Table of Contents Alert
Back to Top