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Microorganisms 2018, 6(2), 49; https://doi.org/10.3390/microorganisms6020049

A Sensitive and Rapid Method to Determine the Adhesion Capacity of Probiotics and Pathogenic Microorganisms to Human Gastrointestinal Mucins

1
Univ.lille, CNRS, UMR8576-UGSF-Unité de Glycobiologie Structurale et Fonctionnelle, F59000 Lille, France
2
Toxalim (Research Centre in Food Toxicology), Université de Toulouse, INRA, ENVT, INP-Purpan, UPS, 31000 Toulouse, France
3
Unité de Glycobiologie Structurale et Fonctionnelle, Campus CNRS de la Haute Borne, 50 avenue de Halley, 59658 Villeneuve d’Ascq, France
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Received: 30 March 2018 / Revised: 22 May 2018 / Accepted: 28 May 2018 / Published: 29 May 2018
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Gut Bacteria-Mucus Interaction)
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Abstract

Mucus is the habitat for the microorganisms, bacteria and yeast that form the commensal flora. Mucins, the main macromolecules of mucus, and more specifically, the glycans that cover them, play essential roles in microbial gastrointestinal colonization. Probiotics and pathogens must also colonize mucus to have lasting positive or deleterious effects. The question of which mucin-harboured glycan motifs favour the adhesion of specific microorganisms remains very poorly studied. In the current study, a simple test based on the detection of fluorescent-labeled microorganisms raised against microgram amounts of mucins spotted on nitrocellulose was developed. The adhesion of various probiotic, commensal and pathogenic microorganisms was evaluated on a panel of human purified gastrointestinal mucins and compared with that of commercially available pig gastric mucins (PGM) and of mucins secreted by the colonic cancer cell line HT29-MTX. The latter two proved to be very poor indicators of adhesion capacity on intestinal mucins. Our results show that the nature of the sialylated cores of O-glycans, determined by MALDI MS-MS analysis, potentially enables sialic acid residues to modulate the adhesion of microorganisms either positively or negatively. Other identified factors affecting the adhesion propensity were O-glycan core types and the presence of blood group motifs. This test should help to select probiotics with enhanced adhesion capabilities as well as deciphering the role of specific mucin glycotopes on microbial adhesion. View Full-Text
Keywords: bacterial adhesion; mucin; O-glycosylation; sialic acids; probiotics; bacterial pathogens bacterial adhesion; mucin; O-glycosylation; sialic acids; probiotics; bacterial pathogens
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This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. (CC BY 4.0).
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Ringot-Destrez, B.; D’Alessandro, Z.; Lacroix, J.-M.; Mercier-Bonin, M.; Léonard, R.; Robbe-Masselot, C. A Sensitive and Rapid Method to Determine the Adhesion Capacity of Probiotics and Pathogenic Microorganisms to Human Gastrointestinal Mucins. Microorganisms 2018, 6, 49.

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