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Microorganisms 2018, 6(2), 50; https://doi.org/10.3390/microorganisms6020050

Antifungal Peptides of the AFP Family Revisited: Are These Cannibal Toxins?

Department Applied and Molecular Microbiology, Technische Universität Berlin, Institute of Biotechnology, Gustav-Meyer-Allee 25, D-13355 Berlin, Germany
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Received: 24 April 2018 / Revised: 24 May 2018 / Accepted: 28 May 2018 / Published: 2 June 2018
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Antimicrobial Proteins in Filamentous Fungi)
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Abstract

The emergence and spread of pathogenic fungi resistant to currently used antifungal drugs represents a serious challenge for medicine and agriculture. The use of smart antimicrobials, so-called “dirty drugs” which affect multiple cellular targets, is one strategy to prevent resistance. Of special interest is the exploitation of the AFP family of antimicrobial peptides, which include its founding member AFP from Aspergillus giganteus. This latter is a highly potent inhibitor of chitin synthesis and affects plasma membrane integrity in many human and plant pathogenic fungi. A transcriptomic meta-analysis of the afp-encoding genes in A. giganteus and A. niger predicts a role for these proteins during asexual sporulation, autophagy, and nutrient recycling, suggesting that AFPs are molecules important for the survival of A. niger and A. giganteus under nutrient limitation. In this review, we discuss parallels which exist between AFPs and bacterial cannibal toxins and provide arguments that the primary function of AFPs could be to kill genetically identical siblings. We hope that this review inspires computational and experimental biologists studying alternative explanations for the nature and function of antimicrobial peptides beyond the general assumption that they are mere defense molecules to fight competitors. View Full-Text
Keywords: antimicrobial peptide; antifungal; AFP; AnAFP; mode of action; Aspergillus niger; Aspergillus giganteus; sporulation; Bacillus; cannibal toxin antimicrobial peptide; antifungal; AFP; AnAFP; mode of action; Aspergillus niger; Aspergillus giganteus; sporulation; Bacillus; cannibal toxin
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This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. (CC BY 4.0).
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Meyer, V.; Jung, S. Antifungal Peptides of the AFP Family Revisited: Are These Cannibal Toxins? Microorganisms 2018, 6, 50.

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