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Microorganisms 2015, 3(3), 310-326; doi:10.3390/microorganisms3030310

Temporal Study of the Microbial Diversity of the North Arm of Great Salt Lake, Utah, U.S.

1
Microbiome Analysis Center, Department of Environmental Science and Policy, George Mason University, 10900 University Blvd., Manassas, VA 20110, USA
2
Great Salt Lake Institute, Westminster College, 1840 South 1300 East, Salt Lake City, UT 84105, USA
These authors contributed equally to this work.
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editors: Ricardo Amils and Elena González Toril
Received: 14 May 2015 / Revised: 12 June 2015 / Accepted: 15 June 2015 / Published: 2 July 2015
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Extremophiles)
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Abstract

We employed a temporal sampling approach to understand how the microbial diversity may shift in the north arm of Great Salt Lake, Utah, U.S. To determine how variations in seasonal environmental factors affect microbial communities, length heterogeneity PCR fingerprinting was performed using consensus primers for the domain Bacteria, and the haloarchaea. The archaeal fingerprints showed similarities during 2003 and 2004, but this diversity changed during the remaining two years of the study, 2005 and 2006. We also performed molecular phylogenetic analysis of the 16S rRNA genes of the whole microbial community to characterize the taxa in the samples. Our results indicated that in the domain, Bacteria, the Salinibacter group dominated the populations in all samplings. However, in the case of Archaea, as noted by LIBSHUFF for phylogenetic relatedness analysis, many of the temporal communities were distinct from each other, and changes in community composition did not track with environmental parameters. Around 20–23 different phylotypes, as revealed by rarefaction, predominated at different periods of the year. Some phylotypes, such as Haloquadradum, were present year-round although they changed in their abundance in different samplings, which may indicate that these species are affected by biotic factors, such as nutrients or viruses, that are independent of seasonal temperature dynamics. View Full-Text
Keywords: molecular phylogeny and molecular biology; haloarchaea; halophile: ecology; biotechnology; phylogeny; genetics; taxonomy; enzymes molecular phylogeny and molecular biology; haloarchaea; halophile: ecology; biotechnology; phylogeny; genetics; taxonomy; enzymes
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MDPI and ACS Style

Almeida-Dalmet, S.; Sikaroodi, M.; Gillevet, P.M.; Litchfield, C.D.; Baxter, B.K. Temporal Study of the Microbial Diversity of the North Arm of Great Salt Lake, Utah, U.S.. Microorganisms 2015, 3, 310-326.

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