Next Article in Journal
The Role of the Mammalian Prion Protein in the Control of Sleep
Next Article in Special Issue
Lessons Learned from Protective Immune Responses to Optimize Vaccines against Cryptosporidiosis
Previous Article in Journal
Italian Physicians’ Opinions on Rotavirus Vaccine Implementation
Article Menu

Export Article

Open AccessArticle
Pathogens 2017, 6(4), 57; https://doi.org/10.3390/pathogens6040057

Microscopic and Molecular Tracing of Cryptosporidium Oocysts: Identifying a Possible Reservoir of Infection in Red Grouse

1
Game & Wildlife Conservation Trust, The Coach House, Eggleston Hall, Barnard Castle, Co. Durham DL12 0AG, UK
2
Animal and Plant Health Agency, Woodham Lane, Addlestone KT15 3NB, UK
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Received: 20 October 2017 / Revised: 6 November 2017 / Accepted: 10 November 2017 / Published: 13 November 2017
View Full-Text   |   Download PDF [186 KB, uploaded 13 November 2017]

Abstract

Infection by Cryptosporidium baileyi causes respiratory cryptosporidiosis in red grouse Lagopus lagopus scotica. First diagnosed in 2010, it has since been detected across half of moors managed for grouse shooting in northern England. We hypothesised that contaminated grouse faeces within communal trays visited by grouse containing grit coated with flubendazole, provided to control Trichostrongylus tenuis parasites of grouse, is a reservoir of infection. To establish the basis to this hypothesis, contents of 23 trays from a grouse moor were examined for Cryptosporidium oocysts. Contents were subjected to Immuno Magnetic Separation oocyst concentration techniques prior to examination by Immuno Fluorescence Antibody Test microscopy and molecular analysis on the 18S rRNA gene. Seven of 13 (54%) grit trays known to be used by infected grouse were positive for Cryptosporidium by IMS-IFAT, compared to two of 10 (20%) random background trays. Ten of the 13 (77%) trays used by infected birds amplified positive for Cryptosporidium by Polymerase Chain Reaction and three of the 10 (30%) random trays. All PCR amplified products sequenced matched with C. baileyi, with C. parvum also present in one tray. These data suggest that trays used to “worm” grouse may act as reservoirs of Cryptosporidium infection and their future design may need to be reconsidered to minimise contamination. View Full-Text
Keywords: medicated grit; parasite; radio-tracking; respiratory cryptosporidiosis; Trichostrongylus tenuis medicated grit; parasite; radio-tracking; respiratory cryptosporidiosis; Trichostrongylus tenuis
This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. (CC BY 4.0).
SciFeed

Share & Cite This Article

MDPI and ACS Style

Baines, D.; Giles, M.; Richardson, M. Microscopic and Molecular Tracing of Cryptosporidium Oocysts: Identifying a Possible Reservoir of Infection in Red Grouse. Pathogens 2017, 6, 57.

Show more citation formats Show less citations formats

Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Related Articles

Article Metrics

Article Access Statistics

1

Comments

[Return to top]
Pathogens EISSN 2076-0817 Published by MDPI AG, Basel, Switzerland RSS E-Mail Table of Contents Alert
Back to Top