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Pathogens 2014, 3(3), 769-790; doi:10.3390/pathogens3030769

Early Development of the Gut Microbiota and Immune Health

1
Unitat Mixta d'Investigació en Genòmica i Salut, Fundación para el Fomento de la Investigación Sanitaria y Biomédica de la Comunitat Valenciana (FISABIO)-Salud Pública/Institut Cavanilles de Biodiversitat i Biologia Evolutiva (Universitat de València), València 46020, Spain
2
School of Natural Sciences, University of California Merced, CA 95343, USA 
Received: 18 December 2013 / Revised: 29 August 2014 / Accepted: 19 September 2014 / Published: 24 September 2014
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Gut Microbiome)
View Full-Text   |   Download PDF [241 KB, uploaded 25 September 2014]

Abstract

In recent years, the increase in human microbiome research brought about by the rapidly evolving “omic” technologies has established that the balance among the microbial groups present in the human gut, and their multipronged interactions with the host, are crucial for health. On the other hand, epidemiological and experimental support has also grown for the ‘early programming hypothesis’, according to which factors that act in utero and early in life program the risks for adverse health outcomes later on. The microbiota of the gut develops during infancy, in close interaction with immune development, and with extensive variability across individuals. It follows that the specific process of gut colonization and the microbe-host interactions established in an individual during this period have the potential to represent main determinants of life-long propensity to immune disease. Although much remains to be learnt on the progression of events by which the gut microbiota becomes established and initiates its intimate relationships with the host, and on the long-term repercussions of this process, recent works have advanced significatively in this direction. View Full-Text
Keywords: human microbiome; gut microbiota; immune disease; atopy; necrotizing enterocolitis; infant gut; early programming; microbe-host interactions; intrauterine transmission; antibiotics human microbiome; gut microbiota; immune disease; atopy; necrotizing enterocolitis; infant gut; early programming; microbe-host interactions; intrauterine transmission; antibiotics
This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License (CC BY 3.0).

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Francino, M.P. Early Development of the Gut Microbiota and Immune Health. Pathogens 2014, 3, 769-790.

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