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Soc. Sci. 2017, 6(1), 31; doi:10.3390/socsci6010031

At the Interface of National and Transnational: The Development of Finnish Policies against Domestic Violence in Terms of Gender Equality

Department of Social Sciences and Philosophy, University of Jyväskylä, Jyväskylän yliopisto 40014, Finland
Academic Editor: Nancy A. Naples
Received: 28 December 2016 / Revised: 2 March 2017 / Accepted: 9 March 2017 / Published: 15 March 2017
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Women, Gender and Politics: An International Overview)
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Abstract

Although gender inequalities are the main social mechanisms behind the (re)production of domestic violence, policy responses to domestic violence as a gender-related problem vary at both the national and transnational levels. This article examines the interaction between national and transnational policies against domestic violence, focusing on how domestic violence is constructed as a gender-related problem in Finland, a Nordic welfare state that is often cited as a role model in gender equality. Using the conception of policies as historically changing and culturally specific discourses, this article offers an overview of the ways in which the perspective on domestic violence of the transnational feminist movement has been engaged and transformed in the Finnish context over the five last decades. It is shown that transnational pressure has played a critical role in pushing Finland towards a stronger recognition of domestic violence as a gender issue. However, this transformation has taken place rather within the framework of more neutral “women-friendly” welfare policies than within a feminist framework. The article concludes that the Finnish way of translating transnational norms to the national level is characterized by a tendency to modify the transformative meanings underpinning the transnational feminist discourses to a more gender-neutral form. View Full-Text
Keywords: domestic violence; violence against women; policy responses; gender equality; feminist movement; transnational perspective; interaction between national and transnational; social policy; welfare states; Finland domestic violence; violence against women; policy responses; gender equality; feminist movement; transnational perspective; interaction between national and transnational; social policy; welfare states; Finland
This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. (CC BY 4.0).

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Virkki, T. At the Interface of National and Transnational: The Development of Finnish Policies against Domestic Violence in Terms of Gender Equality. Soc. Sci. 2017, 6, 31.

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