Next Article in Journal
At the Interface of National and Transnational: The Development of Finnish Policies against Domestic Violence in Terms of Gender Equality
Next Article in Special Issue
Gendered Perceptions of Cultural and Skill Alignment in Technology Companies
Previous Article in Journal
Active Listening Attitude Scale (ALAS): Reliability and Validity in a Nationwide Sample of Greek Educators
Previous Article in Special Issue
Collaboration and Gender Equity among Academic Scientists
Article Menu

Export Article

Open AccessFeature PaperArticle
Soc. Sci. 2017, 6(1), 29; doi:10.3390/socsci6010029

Gender in Engineering Departments: Are There Gender Differences in Interruptions of Academic Job Talks?

1
Department of Sociology, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, CA 92093, USA
2
Department of Chemical Engineering and Materials Science, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA 90007, USA
3
Department of Sociology, University of California, Santa Barbara, Santa Barbara, CA 93106, USA
4
Lindamood-Bell Learning Processes, 445 Marine View Ave #290, Del Mar, CA 92014, USA
5
Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, CA 92093, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editors: Maria Charles and Sarah Thébaud
Received: 1 September 2016 / Revised: 28 December 2016 / Accepted: 1 March 2017 / Published: 14 March 2017
View Full-Text   |   Download PDF [949 KB, uploaded 14 March 2017]   |  

Abstract

We use a case study of job talks in five engineering departments to analyze the under-studied area of gendered barriers to finalists for faculty positions. We focus on one segment of the interview day of short-listed candidates invited to campus: the “job talk”, when candidates present their original research to the academic department. We analyze video recordings of 119 job talks across five engineering departments at two Research 1 universities. Specifically, we analyze whether there are differences by gender or by years of post-Ph.D. experience in the number of interruptions, follow-up questions, and total questions that job candidates receive. We find that, compared to men, women receive more follow-up questions and more total questions. Moreover, a higher proportion of women’s talk time is taken up by the audience asking questions. Further, the number of questions is correlated with the job candidate’s statements and actions that reveal he or she is rushing to present their slides and complete the talk. We argue that women candidates face more interruptions and often have less time to bring their talk to a compelling conclusion, which is connected to the phenomenon of “stricter standards” of competence demanded by evaluators of short-listed women applying for a masculine-typed job. We conclude with policy recommendations. View Full-Text
Keywords: gender; STEM; interruptions; job talks; gender bias; faculty hiring; underrepresentation of women; women in science; double standards; stricter standards gender; STEM; interruptions; job talks; gender bias; faculty hiring; underrepresentation of women; women in science; double standards; stricter standards
Figures

Figure 1

This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. (CC BY 4.0).

Scifeed alert for new publications

Never miss any articles matching your research from any publisher
  • Get alerts for new papers matching your research
  • Find out the new papers from selected authors
  • Updated daily for 49'000+ journals and 6000+ publishers
  • Define your Scifeed now

SciFeed Share & Cite This Article

MDPI and ACS Style

Blair-Loy, M.; Rogers, L.E.; Glaser, D.; Wong, Y.L.A.; Abraham, D.; Cosman, P.C. Gender in Engineering Departments: Are There Gender Differences in Interruptions of Academic Job Talks? Soc. Sci. 2017, 6, 29.

Show more citation formats Show less citations formats

Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Related Articles

Article Metrics

Article Access Statistics

1

Comments

[Return to top]
Soc. Sci. EISSN 2076-0760 Published by MDPI AG, Basel, Switzerland RSS E-Mail Table of Contents Alert
Back to Top