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Buildings 2016, 6(3), 33; doi:10.3390/buildings6030033

The Energy Impact in Buildings of Vegetative Solutions for Extensive Green Roofs in Temperate Climates

Construction Technologies Institute of National Research Council of Italy, Via Lombardia 49, San Giuliano Milanese, Milano 20098, Italy
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Academic Editor: Cinzia Buratti
Received: 23 June 2016 / Revised: 11 August 2016 / Accepted: 13 August 2016 / Published: 26 August 2016
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Building Refurbishment and Energy Performance)
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Abstract

Many bibliographical studies have highlighted the positive effects of green roofs as technological solutions both for new and renovated buildings. The one-year experimental monitoring campaign conducted has investigated, in detail, some aspects related to the surface temperature variation induced by the presence of different types of vegetation compared to traditional finishing systems for flat roofs and their impact from an energy and environmental point of view. The results obtained underlined how an appropriate vegetative solution selection can contribute to a significant reduction of the external surface temperatures (10 °C–20 °C for I > 500 W/m2 and 0 °C–5 °C for I < 500 W/m2, regardless of the season) compared to traditional flat roofs. During the winter season, the thermal gradients of the planted surface temperatures are close to zero compared to the floor, except under special improving conditions. This entails a significant reduction of the energy loads from summer air conditioning, and an almost conservative behavior with respect to that from winter heating consumption. The analysis of the inside growing medium temperatures returned a further interesting datum, too: the temperature gradient with respect to surface temperature (annual average 4 °C–9 °C) is a function of solar radiation and involves the insulating contribution of the soil. View Full-Text
Keywords: extensive green roofs; environmental monitoring; surface temperatures; building energy demand extensive green roofs; environmental monitoring; surface temperatures; building energy demand
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MDPI and ACS Style

Barozzi, B.; Bellazzi, A.; Pollastro, M.C. The Energy Impact in Buildings of Vegetative Solutions for Extensive Green Roofs in Temperate Climates. Buildings 2016, 6, 33.

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