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Laws 2014, 3(4), 674-692; doi:10.3390/laws3040674

The Impact of Social Networks and Mobile Technologies on the Revolutions in the Arab World—A Study of Egypt and Tunisia

1
Faculty of Law, The University of New South Wales, Sydney, NSW 2052, Australia
2
International Association of Cybercrime Prevention (AILCC), 1-3 rue Frédérick Lemaître, Paris 75020, France
3
Faculty of Law, Humanities and Arts, The University of Wollongong, NSW 2522, Australia
4
College of Law, Qatar University, Doha 2713, Qatar
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Received: 30 April 2014 / Revised: 9 September 2014 / Accepted: 11 September 2014 / Published: 9 October 2014
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Technology, Social Media and Law)
View Full-Text   |   Download PDF [211 KB, uploaded 9 October 2014]

Abstract

Revolts in Tunisia and Egypt have led many observers to speak of the “first digital revolution” in the Arab world. Social media sites, such as Twitter and Facebook, are now recognised as the important tools that facilitated the “Jasmine Revolution”. In fact, the willingness of the Mubarak government to block all internet connection in Egypt has demonstrated the concern over the power of new technologies in facilitating political change. The tenacity of the social movements that are still on-going in the Arab world continues to demonstrate the important role that networked technologies—such as the internet, satellite channels and social networking sites—play in revolutions. The revolutions demonstrate an effective use of social media and other network technologies as an organisational tool, and as a means of asserting pressure on current rulers and future governments. Accordingly, this article seeks to expose freedom of expression as a fundamental democratic principle and the internet network as a vehicle driving the demonstrations in the Arab countries of Tunisia and Egypt. View Full-Text
Keywords: Arab Spring; social networking; freedom of expression; Jasmine Revolution; censorship; Egypt; Tunisia; revolution; Internet Arab Spring; social networking; freedom of expression; Jasmine Revolution; censorship; Egypt; Tunisia; revolution; Internet
This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. (CC BY 4.0).

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MDPI and ACS Style

Maurushat, A.; Chawki, M.; Al-Alosi, H.; el Shazly, Y. The Impact of Social Networks and Mobile Technologies on the Revolutions in the Arab World—A Study of Egypt and Tunisia. Laws 2014, 3, 674-692.

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