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Metals, Volume 3, Issue 3 (September 2013), Pages 237-318

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Research

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Open AccessArticle Grain Refinement and Deformation Mechanisms in Room Temperature Severe Plastic Deformed Mg-AZ31
Metals 2013, 3(3), 283-297; doi:10.3390/met3030283
Received: 27 April 2013 / Revised: 28 June 2013 / Accepted: 12 July 2013 / Published: 18 July 2013
Cited by 1 | PDF Full-text (6608 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
A Ti-AZ31 composite was severely plastically deformed by rotary swaging at room temperature up to a logarithmic deformation strain of 2.98. A value far beyond the forming limit of pure AZ31 when being equivalently deformed. It is observed, that the microstructure evolution [...] Read more.
A Ti-AZ31 composite was severely plastically deformed by rotary swaging at room temperature up to a logarithmic deformation strain of 2.98. A value far beyond the forming limit of pure AZ31 when being equivalently deformed. It is observed, that the microstructure evolution in Mg-AZ31 is strongly influenced by twinning. At low strains the {̅1011} (10̅12) and the {̅1012} (10̅11) twin systems lead to fragmentation of the initial grains. Inside the primary twins, grain refinement takes place by dynamic recrystallization, dynamic recovery and twinning. These mechanisms lead to a final grain size of ≈1 μm, while a strong centered ring fibre texture is evolved. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nanostructured Metal and Metal Oxide Materials)
Figures

Open AccessArticle The Thermal Transformation Arrest Phenomenon in NiCoMnAl Heusler Alloys
Metals 2013, 3(3), 298-311; doi:10.3390/met3030298
Received: 20 May 2013 / Revised: 26 June 2013 / Accepted: 14 August 2013 / Published: 22 August 2013
Cited by 13 | PDF Full-text (3007 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
In this report, we present findings of systematic research on NiCoMnAl alloys, with the purpose of acquiring a higher thermal transformation arrest temperature (TA). By systematic research, TA in the NiCoMnAl alloy systems was raised up to 190 K, compared to the [...] Read more.
In this report, we present findings of systematic research on NiCoMnAl alloys, with the purpose of acquiring a higher thermal transformation arrest temperature (TA). By systematic research, TA in the NiCoMnAl alloy systems was raised up to 190 K, compared to the highest TA of 130 K in NiCoMnIn. For a selected alloy of Ni40Co10Mn33Al17, magnetization measurements were performed under a pulsed high magnetic field, and the critical magnetic field-temperature phase diagram was determined. The magnetic phase diagram for Ni50-xCoxMn50-yAly was also established. Moreover, from the discussion that the formerly called “kinetic arrest phenomenon” has both thermodynamic and kinetic factors, we suggest a terminology change to the “thermal transformation arrest phenomenon”. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Shape Memory Alloys)
Open AccessArticle Exotic Alloys Obtained by Condensation of Metallic Vapors
Metals 2013, 3(3), 312-318; doi:10.3390/met3030312
Received: 18 August 2013 / Revised: 11 September 2013 / Accepted: 16 September 2013 / Published: 24 September 2013
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Abstract
New methods of producing small quantities of exotic alloys from immiscible metals (and elements in general) are described with two examples: An alloy of aluminium with silver and one of aluminium with tungsten. There is no limit to the number of components [...] Read more.
New methods of producing small quantities of exotic alloys from immiscible metals (and elements in general) are described with two examples: An alloy of aluminium with silver and one of aluminium with tungsten. There is no limit to the number of components that can form special alloys by this method and their applications can be foreseen to be quite useful in the future. Full article

Review

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Open AccessReview Transformation Volume Effects on Shape Memory Alloys
Metals 2013, 3(3), 237-282; doi:10.3390/met3030237
Received: 1 April 2013 / Revised: 12 June 2013 / Accepted: 13 June 2013 / Published: 2 July 2013
Cited by 12 | PDF Full-text (1013 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
It is generally accepted that the martensitic transformations (MTs) in the shape memory alloys (SMAs) are mainly characterized by the shear deformation of the crystal lattice that arises in the course of MT, while a comparatively small volume change during MT is [...] Read more.
It is generally accepted that the martensitic transformations (MTs) in the shape memory alloys (SMAs) are mainly characterized by the shear deformation of the crystal lattice that arises in the course of MT, while a comparatively small volume change during MT is considered as the secondary effect, which can be disregarded when the basic characteristics of MTs and functional properties of SMAs are analyzed. This point of view is a subject to change nowadays due to the new experimental and theoretical findings. The present article elucidates (i) the newly observed physical phenomena in different SMAs in their relation to the volume effect of MT; (ii) the theoretical analysis of the aforementioned volume-related phenomena. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Shape Memory Alloys)

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