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Sports 2015, 3(4), 346-357; doi:10.3390/sports3040346

Is There a Progressive Withdrawal of Physiological Protections against High-Intensity Exercise-Induced Fatigue during Puberty?

Clermont Auvergne University, Blaise Pascal University, EA 3533, Laboratory of metabolic adaptations during exercise in physiological and pathological conditions (AME2P), BP 80026, Aubière cedex F-63171, France
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Academic Editor: Craig Williams
Received: 16 October 2015 / Revised: 27 November 2015 / Accepted: 30 November 2015 / Published: 4 December 2015
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Paediatric Exercise Physiology)
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Abstract

Puberty is characterized by a large number of physiological modifications that translate into increased neuromuscular fatigue during high-intensity exercise in adolescents compared to prepubertal children. This greater neuromuscular fatigue in adolescents could be attributed to peripheral (i.e., muscular) and central (i.e., nervous) factors that change through puberty. Among the peripheral changes are muscle mass, fiber type composition, energy metabolism and musculo-tendinous stiffness. Among the central modifications are the voluntary activation level, the antagonist co-activation and a differential interplay between central and peripheral fatigue. The objective of this review article will be to underline the importance of these factors on the development of neuromuscular fatigue during high-intensity exercise throughout puberty and to highlight that the adolescents could be physiologically less protected against fatiguing high-intensity exercise than their prepubertal counterparts. View Full-Text
Keywords: maturation; growth; neuromuscular fatigue; intense exercise and protective mechanisms maturation; growth; neuromuscular fatigue; intense exercise and protective mechanisms
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This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. (CC BY 4.0).

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Ratel, S.; Martin, V. Is There a Progressive Withdrawal of Physiological Protections against High-Intensity Exercise-Induced Fatigue during Puberty? Sports 2015, 3, 346-357.

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