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Sports 2015, 3(4), 335-345; doi:10.3390/sports3040335

Using Rowers’ Perceptions of On-Water Stroke Success to Evaluate Sculling Catch Efficiency Variables via a Boat Instrumentation System

1
Sport Performance Research Institute New Zealand (SPRINZ), School of Sport and Recreation, Faculty of Health and Environmental Science, Auckland University of Technology, Private Bag 92006, Auckland 1020, New Zealand
2
School of Exercise & Nutrition Sciences, Queensland University of Technology, Kelvin Grove, Victoria Park Road, Kelvin Grove, Brisbane QLD 4059, Australia
These authors contributed equally to this work.
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Eling Douwe de Bruin
Received: 15 June 2015 / Revised: 23 October 2015 / Accepted: 28 October 2015 / Published: 10 November 2015
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Boat-Based Sports Biomechanics)
View Full-Text   |   Download PDF [164 KB, uploaded 11 November 2015]   |  

Abstract

Aim: An effective catch in sculling is a critical determinant of boat velocity. This study used rowers’ performance-based judgments to compare three measures of catch slip efficiency. Two questions were addressed: (1) would rower-judged Yes strokes be faster than No strokes? and (2) which method of quantifying catch slip best reflected these judgements? Methods: Eight single scullers performed two 10-min blocks of sub maximal on-water rowing at 20 strokes per minute. Every 30 s, rowers reported either Yes or No about the quality of their stroke at the catch. Results: It was found that Yes strokes identified by rowers had, on average, a moderate effect advantage over No strokes with a standardised effect size of 0.43. In addition, a quicker time to positive acceleration best reflected the change in performance; where the standardised mean difference score of 0.57 for time to positive acceleration was larger than the scores of 0.47 for time to PowerLine force, and 0.35 for time to 30% peak pin force catch slip measures. For all eight rowers, Yes strokes corresponded to time to positive acceleration occurring earlier than No strokes. Conclusion: Rower judgements about successful strokes was linked to achieving a quicker time to positive acceleration, and may be of the most value in achieving a higher average boat velocity. View Full-Text
Keywords: rowing; biomechanics; performance; judgements and catch rowing; biomechanics; performance; judgements and catch
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This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. (CC BY 4.0).

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MDPI and ACS Style

Millar, S.-K.; Oldham, A.R.H.; Hume, P.A.; Renshaw, I. Using Rowers’ Perceptions of On-Water Stroke Success to Evaluate Sculling Catch Efficiency Variables via a Boat Instrumentation System. Sports 2015, 3, 335-345.

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