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Insects 2015, 6(4), 943-960; doi:10.3390/insects6040943

Mating Success, Longevity, and Fertility of Diabrotica virgifera virgifera LeConte (Chrysomelidae: Coleoptera) in Relation to Body Size and Cry3Bb1-Resistant and Cry3Bb1-Susceptible Genotypes

1
North Central Agricultural Research Laboratory (NCARL), USDA-ARS, 2923 Medary Ave., Brookings, SD 57006, USA
2
NCARL, USDA-ARS, 13786 Thomas Place, Keystone, SD 57751, USA
3
Department of Entomology and Wildlife Ecology, University of Delaware, Newark, DE 19716, USA
Retired.
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Astrid T. Groot
Received: 6 August 2015 / Revised: 26 August 2015 / Accepted: 29 October 2015 / Published: 10 November 2015
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Sexual Communication in An Evolutionary Context)
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Abstract

Insect resistance to population control methodologies is a widespread problem. The development of effective resistance management programs is often dependent on detailed knowledge regarding the biology of individual species and changes in that biology associated with resistance evolution. This study examined the reproductive behavior and biology of western corn rootworm beetles of known body size from lines resistant and susceptible to the Cry3Bb1 protein toxin expressed in transgenic Bacillus thuringiensis maize. In crosses between, and within, the resistant and susceptible genotypes, no differences occurred in mating frequency, copulation duration, courtship duration, or fertility; however, females mated with resistant males showed reduced longevity. Body size did not vary with genotype. Larger males and females were not more likely to mate than smaller males and females, but larger females laid more eggs. Moderately strong, positive correlation occurred between the body sizes of successfully mated males and females; however, weak correlation also existed for pairs that did not mate. Our study provided only limited evidence for fitness costs associated with the Cry3Bb1-resistant genotype that might reduce the persistence in populations of the resistant genotype but provided additional evidence for size-based, assortative mating, which could favor the persistence of resistant genotypes affecting body size. View Full-Text
Keywords: mating frequency; courtship duration; copulation duration; life history traits; leaf beetle; western corn rootworm; transgenic maize mating frequency; courtship duration; copulation duration; life history traits; leaf beetle; western corn rootworm; transgenic maize
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This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. (CC BY 4.0).

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MDPI and ACS Style

French, B.W.; Hammack, L.; Tallamy, D.W. Mating Success, Longevity, and Fertility of Diabrotica virgifera virgifera LeConte (Chrysomelidae: Coleoptera) in Relation to Body Size and Cry3Bb1-Resistant and Cry3Bb1-Susceptible Genotypes. Insects 2015, 6, 943-960.

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