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Insects 2015, 6(4), 805-814; doi:10.3390/insects6040805

Similar Comparative Low and High Doses of Deltamethrin and Acetamiprid Differently Impair the Retrieval of the Proboscis Extension Reflex in the Forager Honey Bee (Apis mellifera)

1
LBLGC UPRES EA 1207, Collégium Sciences et Techniques, Université d’Orléans, 2 rue de Chartres, BP 6759, Orléans 45067, France
2
RCIM UPRES EA 2647, USC INRA 1330, Université d’Angers, 2 Bd. Lavoisier, Angers 49045, France
3
CEISAM UMR 6230, UFR des Sciences et des Techniques, Université de Nantes, 2 rue de la Houssinière, BP 92208, Nantes F-44000, France
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Brian T. Forschler
Received: 24 July 2015 / Revised: 17 September 2015 / Accepted: 21 September 2015 / Published: 28 September 2015
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Abstract

In the present study, the effects of low (10 ng/bee) and high (100 ng/bee) doses of acetamiprid and deltamethrin insecticides on multi-trial learning and retrieval were evaluated in the honey bee Apis mellifera. After oral application, acetamiprid and deltamethrin at the concentrations used were not able to impair learning sessions. When the retention tests were performed 1 h, 6 h, and 24 h after learning, we found a significant difference between bees after learning sessions when drugs were applied 24 h before learning. Deltamethrin-treated bees were found to be more sensitive at 10 ng/bee and 100 ng/bee doses compared to acetamiprid-treated bees, only with amounts of 100 ng/bee and at 6 h and 24 h delays. When insecticides were applied during learning sessions, none of the tested insecticides was able to impair learning performance at 10 ng/bee or 100 ng/bee but retention performance was altered 24 h after learning sessions. Acetamiprid was the only one to impair retrieval at 10 ng/bee, whereas at 100 ng/bee an impairment of retrieval was found with both insecticides. The present results therefore suggest that acetamiprid and deltamethrin are able to impair retrieval performance in the honey bee Apis mellifera. View Full-Text
Keywords: Neonicotinoid; pyrethroid; pesticides; acetamiprid; deltamethrin; honey bee; insect Neonicotinoid; pyrethroid; pesticides; acetamiprid; deltamethrin; honey bee; insect
This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. (CC BY 4.0).

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MDPI and ACS Style

Thany, S.H.; Bourdin, C.M.; Graton, J.; Laurent, A.D.; Mathé-Allainmat, M.; Lebreton, J.; Le Questel, J.-Y. Similar Comparative Low and High Doses of Deltamethrin and Acetamiprid Differently Impair the Retrieval of the Proboscis Extension Reflex in the Forager Honey Bee (Apis mellifera). Insects 2015, 6, 805-814.

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