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Insects 2014, 5(2), 459-473; doi:10.3390/insects5020459
Article

Female Moth Calling and Flight Behavior Are Altered Hours Following Pheromone Autodetection: Possible Implications for Practical Management with Mating Disruption

1,* , 2
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Received: 27 March 2014; in revised form: 20 May 2014 / Accepted: 23 May 2014 / Published: 19 June 2014
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Pheromones and Insect Behaviour)
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Abstract: Female moths are known to detect their own sex pheromone—a phenomenon called “autodetection”. Autodetection has various effects on female moth behavior, including altering natural circadian rhythm of calling behavior, inducing flight, and in some cases causing aggregations of conspecifics. A proposed hypothesis for the possible evolutionary benefits of autodetection is its possible role as a spacing mechanism to reduce female-female competition. Here, we explore autodetection in two species of tortricids (Grapholita molesta (Busck) and Choristoneura rosaceana (Harris)). We find that females of both species not only “autodetect,” but that learning (change in behavior following experience) occurs, which affects behavior for at least 24 hours after pheromone pre-exposure. Specifically, female calling in both species is advanced at least 24 hours, but not 5 days, following pheromone pre-exposure. Also, the propensity of female moths to initiate flight and the duration of flights, as quantified by a laboratory flight mill, were advanced in pre-exposed females as compared with controls. Pheromone pre-exposure did not affect the proportion of mated moths when they were confined with males in small enclosures over 24 hours in laboratory assays. We discuss the possible implications of these results with respect to management of these known pest species with the use of pheromone-based mating disruption.
Keywords: autodetection; anosmia; olfaction; pheromone communication; sex pheromone; mating disruption autodetection; anosmia; olfaction; pheromone communication; sex pheromone; mating disruption
This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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MDPI and ACS Style

Stelinski, L.; Holdcraft, R.; Rodriguez-Saona, C. Female Moth Calling and Flight Behavior Are Altered Hours Following Pheromone Autodetection: Possible Implications for Practical Management with Mating Disruption. Insects 2014, 5, 459-473.

AMA Style

Stelinski L, Holdcraft R, Rodriguez-Saona C. Female Moth Calling and Flight Behavior Are Altered Hours Following Pheromone Autodetection: Possible Implications for Practical Management with Mating Disruption. Insects. 2014; 5(2):459-473.

Chicago/Turabian Style

Stelinski, Lukasz; Holdcraft, Robert; Rodriguez-Saona, Cesar. 2014. "Female Moth Calling and Flight Behavior Are Altered Hours Following Pheromone Autodetection: Possible Implications for Practical Management with Mating Disruption." Insects 5, no. 2: 459-473.


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