Next Article in Journal
Influence of UV Treatment on the Food Safety Status of a Model Aquaponic System
Next Article in Special Issue
Analysing the Effects of Forest Cover and Irrigation Farm Dams on Streamflows of Water-Scarce Catchments in South Australia through the SWAT Model
Previous Article in Journal
Understanding Public Perception of and Participation in Non-Revenue Water Management in Malaysia to Support Urban Water Policy
Previous Article in Special Issue
Economic Sustainability of Payments for Water Yield in Slash Pine Plantations in Florida
Article Menu
Issue 1 (January) cover image

Export Article

Open AccessArticle
Water 2017, 9(1), 28; doi:10.3390/w9010028

Addressing Groundwater Declines with Precision Agriculture: An Economic Comparison of Monitoring Methods for Variable-Rate Irrigation

1
Department of Agricultural Economics and Agribusiness, University of Arkansas, 217 Agriculture Building, Fayetteville, AR 72701, USA
2
Public Policy Ph.D. Program, University of Arkansas, 213 Gearhart Hall, Fayetteville, AR 72701, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Kristiana Hansen
Received: 18 September 2016 / Revised: 27 December 2016 / Accepted: 30 December 2016 / Published: 6 January 2017
View Full-Text   |   Download PDF [1228 KB, uploaded 6 January 2017]   |  

Abstract

Irrigated row-crop agriculture is contributing to declining groundwater in areas such as the Mississippi Delta region of eastern Arkansas. There is a need to move toward sustainable levels of groundwater withdrawal. Recent improvements in remote monitoring technologies such as wireless soil moisture sensors and unmanned aerial vehicles offer the potential for farmers to effectively practice site-specific variable-rate irrigation management for the purpose of applying water more efficiently, reducing pumping costs, and retaining groundwater. Soil moisture sensors and unmanned aerial vehicles are compared here in terms of their net returns per acre-foot and cost-effectiveness of aquifer retention. Soil moisture sensors ($9.09 per acre-foot) offer slightly more net returns to producers than unmanned aerial vehicles ($7.69 per acre-foot), though costs associated with unmanned aerial vehicles continue to drop as more manufacturers enter the market and regulations become clear. View Full-Text
Keywords: precision agriculture; unmanned aerial vehicles; UAV; soil moisture sensors; variable-rate irrigation; cost-effectiveness; technology adoption precision agriculture; unmanned aerial vehicles; UAV; soil moisture sensors; variable-rate irrigation; cost-effectiveness; technology adoption
Figures

Figure 1

This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. (CC BY 4.0).

Scifeed alert for new publications

Never miss any articles matching your research from any publisher
  • Get alerts for new papers matching your research
  • Find out the new papers from selected authors
  • Updated daily for 49'000+ journals and 6000+ publishers
  • Define your Scifeed now

SciFeed Share & Cite This Article

MDPI and ACS Style

West, G.H.; Kovacs, K. Addressing Groundwater Declines with Precision Agriculture: An Economic Comparison of Monitoring Methods for Variable-Rate Irrigation. Water 2017, 9, 28.

Show more citation formats Show less citations formats

Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Related Articles

Article Metrics

Article Access Statistics

1

Comments

[Return to top]
Water EISSN 2073-4441 Published by MDPI AG, Basel, Switzerland RSS E-Mail Table of Contents Alert
Back to Top