Next Article in Journal
Estimation of Groundwater Recharge Using Tracers and Numerical Modeling in the North China Plain
Next Article in Special Issue
Identifying Efficient Nitrate Reduction Strategies in the Upper Danube
Previous Article in Journal
Engaging Southwestern Tribes in Sustainable Water Resources Topics and Management
Previous Article in Special Issue
Water Level Loggers as a Low-Cost Tool for Monitoring of Stormwater Control Measures
Article Menu

Export Article

Open AccessArticle
Water 2016, 8(8), 352; doi:10.3390/w8080352

“Like a Second Home”: Conceptualizing Experiences within the Fox River Watershed through a Framework of Emplacement

1
Sociology Department, University of Wisconsin Oshkosh, 800 Algoma Blvd. Oshkosh, WI 54901, USA
2
Geography Department, University of Wisconsin Oshkosh, 800 Algoma Blvd. Oshkosh, WI 54901, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editors: Joan M. Brehm and Brian W. Eisenhauer
Received: 1 June 2016 / Revised: 9 July 2016 / Accepted: 9 August 2016 / Published: 18 August 2016
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Watershed Protection and Management)
View Full-Text   |   Download PDF [7511 KB, uploaded 18 August 2016]   |  

Abstract

We propose and implement a new emplacement framework through exploration of the socio-spatial landscape of the Fox River Watershed (FRW) in Northeastern Wisconsin from a particular cultural perspective. Based primarily upon interviews conducted with 16 Hmong people to better understand and learn from the experiences of an important but overlooked FRW stakeholder group, we present our findings through the components of this framework: displacement, misplacement, replacement, and emplacement. Our research reveals that the strength of Hmong culture has persisted through tremendous loss and displacement, to survive and evolve in a new setting. The resettlement of Hmong people in the FRW has afforded relatively widespread access to landscapes that facilitate recreation, social interaction, and food production, enhancing physical and mental health and augmenting household incomes. It has also led to empowerment of women and the emergence of a generation of group members with formal ecological knowledge to add to their existing ethnobiological understanding and cultural foundation of ecological conscience. For such reasons, conservation organizations, policy makers, and departments of natural resources should look to build linking social capital between those in power and marginalized groups such as the Hmong. View Full-Text
Keywords: place; watershed; Hmong; cultural landscapes; social capital; environmental justice; interdisciplinary research place; watershed; Hmong; cultural landscapes; social capital; environmental justice; interdisciplinary research
Figures

Figure 1

This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. (CC BY 4.0).

Scifeed alert for new publications

Never miss any articles matching your research from any publisher
  • Get alerts for new papers matching your research
  • Find out the new papers from selected authors
  • Updated daily for 49'000+ journals and 6000+ publishers
  • Define your Scifeed now

SciFeed Share & Cite This Article

MDPI and ACS Style

Van Auken, P.M.; Barron, E.S.; Xiong, C.; Persson, C. “Like a Second Home”: Conceptualizing Experiences within the Fox River Watershed through a Framework of Emplacement. Water 2016, 8, 352.

Show more citation formats Show less citations formats

Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Related Articles

Article Metrics

Article Access Statistics

1

Comments

[Return to top]
Water EISSN 2073-4441 Published by MDPI AG, Basel, Switzerland RSS E-Mail Table of Contents Alert
Back to Top