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Water 2016, 8(11), 502; doi:10.3390/w8110502

Treatment Wetland Aeration without Electricity? Lessons Learned from the First Experiment Using a Wind-Driven Air Pump

1
Helmholtz Center for Environmental Research (UFZ), Environmental and Biotechnology Center (UBZ), Permoserstrasse 15, 04318 Leipzig, Germany
2
Naturally Wallace Consulting LLC, 7801 Vauxhill Drive, P.O. Box 99587, Raleigh, NC 27624, USA
3
Regional Development Victoria, 121 Exhibition Street, Melbourne 3000, Australia
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editors: Hans Brix, Carlos A. Arias and Pedro N. Carvalho
Received: 30 August 2016 / Revised: 20 October 2016 / Accepted: 24 October 2016 / Published: 2 November 2016
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Constructed Wetlands for Water Treatment: New Developments)
View Full-Text   |   Download PDF [2144 KB, uploaded 2 November 2016]   |  

Abstract

Aerated treatment wetlands have become an increasingly recognized technology for treating wastewaters from domestic and various industrial origins. To date, treatment wetland aeration is provided by air pumps which require access to the energy grid. The requirement for electricity increases the ecological footprint of an aerated wetland and limits the application of this technology to areas with centralized electrical infrastructure. Wind power offers another possibility as a driver for wetland aeration, but its use for this purpose has not yet been investigated. This paper reports the first experimental trial using a simple wind-driven air pump to replace the conventional electric air blowers of an aerated horizontal subsurface flow wetland. The wind-driven air pump was connected to a two-year old horizontal flow aerated wetland which had been in continuous (24 h) aeration since startup. The wind-driven aeration system functioned, however it was not specifically adapted to wetland aeration. As a result, treatment performance decreased compared to prior continuous aeration. Inconsistent wind speed at the site may have resulted in insufficient pressure within the aeration manifold, resulting in insufficient air supply to the wetland. This paper discusses the lessons learned during the experiment. View Full-Text
Keywords: aerated wetland; treatment wetland; domestic wastewater; horizontal flow; energy demand aerated wetland; treatment wetland; domestic wastewater; horizontal flow; energy demand
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This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. (CC BY 4.0).

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MDPI and ACS Style

Boog, J.; Nivala, J.; Aubron, T.; Wallace, S.; Sullivan, C.; van Afferden, M.; Müller, R.A. Treatment Wetland Aeration without Electricity? Lessons Learned from the First Experiment Using a Wind-Driven Air Pump. Water 2016, 8, 502.

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