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Water 2018, 10(4), 372; https://doi.org/10.3390/w10040372

Fog Water Collection: Challenges beyond Technology

1
United Nations University Institute for Water, Environment and Health (UNU-INWEH), Hamilton, ON L8P 0A1, Canada
2
Indigenous Affairs, University of Winnipeg, Winnipeg, MB R3B 2E9, Canada
3
Department of Geography, King’s College London, Strand, London WC2R 2LS, UK
4
Worcester Polytechnic Institute, Worcester, MA 01609, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Received: 22 February 2018 / Revised: 19 March 2018 / Accepted: 20 March 2018 / Published: 24 March 2018
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Abstract

The Sustainable Development Goal (SDG) 6, calling for access to safe water and sanitation for all by the year 2030 supports the efforts in water-scarce countries and regions to go beyond conventional resources and tap unconventional water supplies to narrow the water demand-supply gap. Among the unconventional water resources, the potential to collect water from the air, such as fog harvesting, is by far the most under-explored. Fog water collection is a passive, low maintenance, and sustainable option that can supply fresh drinking water to communities where fog events are common. Because of the relatively simple design of fog collection systems, their operation and maintenance are minimal and the associated cost likewise; although, in certain cases, some financially constrained communities would need initial subsidies. Despite technology development and demonstrated benefits, there are certain challenges to fog harvesting, including lack of supportive policies, limited functional local institutions, inexpert communities, gender inequality, and perceived high costs without undertaking comprehensive economic analyses. By addressing such challenges, there is an opportunity to provide potable water in areas where fog intensity and duration are sufficient, and where the competition for clean water is intensifying because water resources are at a far distance or provided by expensive sources. View Full-Text
Keywords: water scarcity; unconventional water resources; atmospheric water; water policies and institutions; gender mainstreaming; community development; sustainable development water scarcity; unconventional water resources; atmospheric water; water policies and institutions; gender mainstreaming; community development; sustainable development
This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. (CC BY 4.0).

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Qadir, M.; Jiménez, G.C.; Farnum, R.L.; Dodson, L.L.; Smakhtin, V. Fog Water Collection: Challenges beyond Technology. Water 2018, 10, 372.

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