Next Article in Journal
The Impact of Green Water Management Strategies on Household-Level Agricultural Water Productivity in a Semi-Arid Region: A Survey-based Assessment
Next Article in Special Issue
Multi-Stakeholder Development of a Serious Game to Explore the Water-Energy-Food-Land-Climate Nexus: The SIM4NEXUS Approach
Previous Article in Journal
Design and Season Influence Nitrogen Dynamics in Two Surface Flow Constructed Wetlands Treating Nursery Irrigation Runoff
Article Menu
Issue 1 (January) cover image

Export Article

Open AccessArticle
Water 2018, 10(1), 10; https://doi.org/10.3390/w10010010

Models, Simulations and Games for Water Management: A Comparative Q-Method Study in The Netherlands and China

1
TIAS School for Business and Society, Tilburg University, Warandelaan 2, 5037 AB Tilburg, The Netherlands
2
Academy for Digital Entertainment, NHTV Breda University of Applied Sciences, Monseigneur Hopmansstraat 1, 4817 JT Breda, The Netherlands
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Received: 4 October 2017 / Revised: 1 December 2017 / Accepted: 13 December 2017 / Published: 24 December 2017
Full-Text   |   PDF [417 KB, uploaded 26 December 2017]   |  

Abstract

Abstract: How do policy analysts perceive the various roles that Models, Simulations and Games (MSG) have, or can have in Integrated Water Resources Management (IWRM)? Fifty-five policy analysts in water management in The Netherlands and China were interviewed, following the procedure of the Q-method. Comparative analysis of the combined quantitative and qualitative data show that: (1) The debate on the role of MSG for IWRM is structured around five frames in The Netherlands and three frames in China. (2) The frames in The Netherlands and China are significantly different. (3) In China, there is a predominant frame that perceives MSG for IWRM as data driven simulation technology for rationalization of water management, which is less significant in The Netherlands. (4) The reverse is true with regard to MSG for stakeholder interaction, learning and integrated assessment, which are significant frames in The Netherlands, but not in China. The conclusion is that frame differences can easily confuse professional and academic debate about MSG for water management; within the same institutional and cultural context, but even more so in Netherlands–China co-operation projects. Frames are also relevant when designing, using or evaluating innovative methods for integrated water resources management. View Full-Text
Keywords: simulations; serious games; Q-method; integrated water resources management; policy analysis simulations; serious games; Q-method; integrated water resources management; policy analysis
Figures

Figure 1

This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. (CC BY 4.0).
SciFeed

Share & Cite This Article

MDPI and ACS Style

Zhou, Q.; Mayer, I.S. Models, Simulations and Games for Water Management: A Comparative Q-Method Study in The Netherlands and China. Water 2018, 10, 10.

Show more citation formats Show less citations formats

Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Related Articles

Article Metrics

Article Access Statistics

1

Comments

[Return to top]
Water EISSN 2073-4441 Published by MDPI AG, Basel, Switzerland RSS E-Mail Table of Contents Alert
Back to Top