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Atmosphere 2015, 6(10), 1578-1589; doi:10.3390/atmos6101578

Radiation Balance of Urban Materials and Their Thermal Impact in Semi-Desert Region: Mexicali, México Study Case

1
Instituto de Ingeniería, Universidad Autónoma de Baja California, Blvd, Benito Juárez y calle de la Normal s/n. Col. Insurgentes Este, C.P. 21280, Mexicali, Baja California, Mexico
2
Graduated of the Doctorate in Engineering Program, Instituto de Ingeniería, Universidad Autónoma de Baja California, Blvd, Benito Juárez y calle de la Normal s/n. Col. Insurgentes Este, C.P. 21280, Mexicali, Baja California, Mexico
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Daniele Contini
Received: 6 August 2015 / Revised: 13 October 2015 / Accepted: 14 October 2015 / Published: 23 October 2015
View Full-Text   |   Download PDF [1138 KB, uploaded 23 October 2015]   |  

Abstract

Net radiation is an essential forcing of climate in the lower layers of Earth’s atmosphere. In this paper, radiation balance is measured in clay soil and green grass, and is compared with three urban materials. These materials: asphalt, concrete and white painted elastomeric polystyrene roofing sheet are widely used in Mexicali, Baja California, México. This study was carried out during August of 2011, the hottest time of the year. The 24-hour average values of net radiation found were: 137.2 W·m2 for asphalt, 119.1 for concrete, 104.6 for clay soil, 152 for green grass and 29.2 for the polystyrene insulation. The latter two types of materials are likely to be the most effective in reducing urban heat island effects. This variation in the radiation balance has widespread implications for human living conditions, as land cover change tends to be towards surfaces that have higher levels of net radiation. View Full-Text
Keywords: net radiation; longwave radiation; shortwave radiation; solar radiation; urban climate; urban coverage net radiation; longwave radiation; shortwave radiation; solar radiation; urban climate; urban coverage
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This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. (CC BY 4.0).

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MDPI and ACS Style

Santillán-Soto, N.; García-Cueto, R.; Haro-Rincón, Z.; Ojeda-Benítez, S.; Quintero-Núñez, M.; Velázquez-Limón, N. Radiation Balance of Urban Materials and Their Thermal Impact in Semi-Desert Region: Mexicali, México Study Case. Atmosphere 2015, 6, 1578-1589.

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